Awesome Real Siberian Cats in Siberia

Many people know about the purebred Siberian cat. They are larger than average, longhaired cats originally from Siberia, Russia. On this page I present what I’d call real Siberia cats. These are technically random bred cats. They live on a farm in Siberia. It is damn cold; up to minus 15 degrees centigrade a worse. These cats are barn cats. They genuinely live in a barn.

They are the sort of Siberian cats from which breeders in the US created the American version of the Siberian cat which is a mainstream, registered pedigree cat. Looking at them, though, they look awesome. They look better than the purebreds. Their fur is longer. They look hardier. They are probably not neutered which will have had an effect on their appearance. Non-neutered male cats look more male than neutered, pampered domestic cats. They say neutering does not change a cat except for the better but I prefer the appearance of non-neutered male cats.

Alla Lebedeva and her husband Sergey live on a farm in Prigorodny, close to Barnaul, in West Siberia. This is not the Far East. It is half way across Russia. Alla took the photos.

Source: Daily Mail via DesignYouTrust.








Facebook Discussion

Comments

Awesome Real Siberian Cats in Siberia — 7 Comments

  1. Wow… I got chills looking at these guys. The photos are awesome, but I would take video in slow motion, maybe 60 fps run at 30 or something. Awesome, hardy, major male, regal… badass. Very impressive.

    • My thoughts exactly. They do look badass but in a good way. Survival skills way. True domestic cats. I feel that this is the way they should be. It is almost like time has stood still. These are how domestic cat were in Siberia a thousand or more years ago probably. Whereas domestic cats in the West have evolved into delicate things.

  2. Here are the Effects of Spaying and Neutering as far as Cats are Concerned

    Health and Behavioral Risks and Downsides

    1) An increased risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer), hemangiosarcoma (a cancer of the lining of the blood vessels), and urinary tract cancer (a type of feline lower urinary tract disease) compared to unneutered/unspayed cats. Hemangiosarcoma is a much more common spay/neuter risk in dogs and is rare in cats.
    2) A tendency to develop Feline Endocrine Alopecia (an endocrine related hair loss). Causes a symmetrical thinning or balding of the hair on the insides of the hind legs and the lower abdomen and occurs mostly on neutered middle-age cats, both male and female.
    3) A fourfold increased risk of prostate cancer in male cats.
    4) An increased, 3.4 fold risk of obesity in both male and female cats, but especially in male cats. A decreased level of sex hormones seems to be associated with an increase in the intake of food. This obesity can be permanent, irreversible, severe, and not respond to changes in diet.
    5) An increased, 2-9 fold risk of diabetes, which is exasperbated by the increased risk of obesity. Diabetes is three times more common in Burmese cats than in other purebred cats.
    6) Early spay and neuter seems to increase the risk of developing slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture on the growth plate that results in the overlaying end of the femur to slip. This is rarely found in dogs.
    7) Prevents a cats bones from developing properly. This can cause hip displasia or malformed hips that cause pain and difficulty when walking and running.
    8) An increased risk of risk of feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) in both neutered males and spayed females. Unspayed female cats seem to have the lowest risk for FLUTD. Males, due to the thinner shape of their urethra, are more susceptible to some problems associated with FLUTD, including stones, a urethral plug, and urethral blockage. Early neutering (neutering before 9 months) may further exasperbate this risk in male cats.
    9) Neutering may increase shyness and hiding, especially in early-neutered male cats.
    10) An increased likelihood of suffering from adverse reactions to vaccinations may occur.
    11) Decreases metabolism by one third. Potential side-effects caused by a metabolic decrease besides obesity are constipation, a feeling of coldness, a lack of energy, and skin and blood pressure problems.
    12) Neutering , especially early neutering, may increase the likelihood of preputial adhesions (adhesions on the prepuce), infections, and scarring to occur
    13) Neutered cats have a higher risk of getting hyperthyroidism than intact cats.
    14) Neutering can cause depression and severe depression, especially in male cats
    15) Neutered cats (especially male ones) are more likely to be lethargic than intact and hormonally intact ones
    16) Neutering can cause complete and permenant personality changes in cats
    17) Neutering can cause cats, especially male cats, to feel disinterested in general
    18) Neutering can cause late complications

    Other Health and Behavioral Effects

    Health Effect 1) The early neutering of male cats (or toms) keeps them from developing the trademark bigger muzzle, jowls, and cheeks that they would otherwise develop.
    Health Effect 2) Castration causes the inability of a tomcat to extrude his penis completely. All intact tomcats and 60% of tomcats neutered at 7 months cat extrude their penis, but no male cat that was neutered as a 7 week old kitten was able to do so.
    Health Effect 3) If neutered early, a male cats penis spines won’t develop properly.
    Health Effect 4) If neutered early, a cat’s anal glands (two glands near he base of the tail) won’t develop properly and they never start spraying. If neutered after the anal glands have developed, they may or may not continue to spray if they have started. Spraying involves shooting out a couple of tiny drops of clear fluid from the anal glands as well as shooting out urine.
    Health Effect 5) Gonadectomies affect physeal cartilage maturation and on the closure of the distal radial physis. In cats, it normally closes at 14-20 months, after puberty for cats. Neutering causes delayed physeal closure, which is most obvious in male cats.
    Health Effect 6) Gonadectomies also have an effect on external genitalia maturation. For example, the external genitals of castrated male and spayed female cats is infantile compared to that of their intact counterparts.
    Health Effect 7) Even if castrating doesn’t cause obesity, it still makes male cats less muscular if castrated early.
    Health Effect 8) Two symptoms of gonadectomies are a loss of confidence and an increased risk of depression. The depression may only last for a few days or they may last for the rest of their life.
    Health Effect 9) Female kittens spayed at 7 weeks have a smaller urethral diameter than intact female kittens
    Health Effect 10) Gonadectomies cause the bones to overgrow in length and to not thicken enough, making their bones longer, thinner, and finer and making the cats appear taller.

    Surgical Complications and Risks

    Anesthesia and Anesthetic Tube Complications

    * Cats can feel high on the anesthesia
    * ​There is small risk of death from the anesthesia: .11% for healthy cats and 1.40 for sick cats
    * The anesthesia tube that goes down the throat during the surgeries (including gonadectomies) can damage the larynx

    Behavioral Surgical Risks and Complications

    * Cat can feel angry after the surgery, often as a response to it
    * Cat can lose the ablility to recognize others (other cats, humans, e.t.c.) whom it has recognized before
    * Cat can respond negatively to the surgery (who wouldn’t, they didn’t consent to having it done on them). For example, a male cat reacts in dismay, disapproval, and even anger in response to noticing a lack of testicles that he had before the surgery.

    Other Surgical Risks and Complications​

    Both Sexes

    * Paralysis
    * Some surgeries may be botched, which can lead to death
    * Sutures may break, which can lead to death
    * Incisions may swell
    * Ruptures may occur, which can lead to death
    * Late complications from the surgery (castration for males, ovariohysterectomies for females)
    * Post-operative renal failure (kidney failure)
    * Wound infection
    * Tracheal damage in cats from the overinflation of the endotracheal tubes (ET)
    * Excessive wound hemorrhage (excessive bleeding during or after surgery)
    * Catatonia (a catatonic state)
    * Pain after surgery (For example, a cat walk stiffly or a cat not wanting to sit down)
    * Death

    Males

    * Swollen, bruised, and/or blood-filled scrotum after surgery
    * Penile and/or urethral laceration
    * Failure to ligate (tie off) the testicular blood vessels adequately

    Other Effects of Indescriminate Desexing in Cats

    1) Neutering reduces the number of available Type B blood donors among cats
    2) Neutering provides rationale for cloning. Before mass neutering, people could let the cat that had a temperament that they liked have kittens and those kittens likely had similarly likeable temperaments. When female cats are spayed, oocytes, female gametocytes, or germ cells are taken out for the purpose of cloning.
    3) Neutering, because it renders an animal sterile, prevents traits, especially rare and newly discovered traits from being perpetuated.
    4) Neutering, because it can cause obesity, provides rationale for putting green tea into cat food in hopes of keeping them trim.
    5) Neutering, because it can cause urinary blockages in male cats, has made special UTI managing cat foods more prevalent.

  3. I’ve found some method and on the Internet about how to calm a female cat in heat including the Needle-less Syringe Tip Method, the Q-Tip Method, the Thermometer Tip Method, and the Finger Accupressure Method.

    Finger Acupressure Method of Calming a Cat in Heat

    1) Have the cat on the floor or a table, preferably the floor.
    2) Have the cat in front of you, facing away from you and with her bottom facing you.
    3) If she hasn’t already lowered her shoulders and lifted her bottom, stroke at the bottom of the back (or the base of her tail) to get her to lift her rump.
    4) When she lowers her shoulders and lifts her bottom, see which side the tail she holds her tail to.
    5) Press the index finger of your dominant hand under her tail right next to where her tail starts. If she holds her tail to the left press your finger on the right side of her tail. If she holds her tail to the right press your finger on the left side of her tail.
    6) Press under and right next to her tail until you feel a hollow. Don’t press on her anus or vulva.
    7) Once you feel the hollow, press down firmly and curve your finger a little toward yourself. Don’t press hard.
    8) When she yowls, which is the reaction she gets when she is mounted and mated by a tom (intact or vasectomized), you can stop pressing.
    9) After you release your finger, the cat will have an orgasm and roll around on the floor.

    Q-Tip Method

    1) Have the cat on the floor or the table, preferably the floor.
    2) Have the cat in front of you, facing away from you and with her bottom facing you.
    3) Have a sterile q-tip. Don’t use Vaseline or any other lubrication on the q-tip.
    4) If she hasn’t already lowered her shoulders and lifted her bottom, stroke at the bottom of the back (or the base of her tail) to get her to lift her rump.
    5) When she lowers her shoulders and lifts her bottom, insert the sterile q-tip into the cat’s vagina. Don’t insert the q-tip into her rectum.
    6) Move the q-tip in and out or rotate the q-tip in the cat’s vagina slowly and gently.
    7) Move the q-tip in and out or rotate the q-tip in the cat’s vagina more quickly, but still gently.
    8) When she yowls, which is the reaction she gets when she is mounted and mated by a tom (intact or vasectomized), you can take the q-tip out.
    9) The cat will have an orgasm and roll around on the floor.

    The Needleless Syringe Tip Method

    1) Have the cat on the floor or the table, preferably the floor.
    2) Have the cat in front of you, facing away from you and with her bottom facing you.
    3) If she hasn’t already lowered her shoulders and lifted her bottom, stroke at the bottom of the back (or the base of her tail) to get her to lift her rump.
    4) When she lowers her shoulders and lifts her bottom, insert the needleless syringe tip into the cat’s vagina
    5) Keep it in only a few seconds
    6) Repeat the process about 4 times during the heat

    The Thermometer Tip Method

    1) Have the cat on the floor or the table, preferably the floor.
    2) Have the cat in front of you, facing away from you and with her bottom facing you.
    3) If she hasn’t already lowered her shoulders and lifted her bottom, stroke at the bottom of the back (or the base of her tail) to get her to lift her rump.
    4) When she lowers her shoulders and lifts her bottom, insert the thermometer tip into the cat’s vagina
    5) Keep it in only a few seconds
    6) Repeat the process about 4 times during the heat

    Don’t do or try this methods when she is not in heat. Don’t try this with an unfamiliar cat. Ask and talk to your vet about these methods.

    The Finger Accupressure Method appeals to me the most.

    Have you heard of any other methods of handling a cat in heat without resorting to spaying her?

    • Nebbie, could you tell me a bit about yourselF? And also is your comment all your own words with no copying from other websites? Thanks for the comment. It is interesting. It is on the wrong page though 🙂

      If you want to comment again (and your comments are welcome) you might like to do a custom search first and then comment on the relevant page.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Please only upload photos that are small in size of max 500px width and 50 KB size. Large images typical of most default settings on digital cameras may fail to upload. Thanks.