Feral Mama Cat and Her Four Kittens

Feral Mama Cat and Her Four Kittens

by Patricia
(Ontario, Canada)

Mama cat and four kittens set up house in our shed. Realizing that mama cat could have more kittens in the future we set out to “catch” them. Mama was friendly right off the bat and came to the door for food and water. She later brought up the kittens and three of them ventured inside to visit with the Cat of the house.

Napoleon was an inside cat, declawed on all four paws by the previous owners. All but one of the kittens were friendly over time and have been neutered along with mama.

One of the kittens had to be trapped in -27ºC weather to prevent it from freezing. She has been in the house since and we have not been able to become friends. She sees the others being petted and loved but never feels safe enough to join in.

She is mute and moves her mouth to meow but only air comes out. It has cost us over $2,000.00 to neuter the four cats that are willing to be petted. She never tries to get out even though the others come and go. We won’t let her out until she is neutered too…

All this to say – we took responsibility and neutered the strays, but what to do with Wee Baby? She shows some signs of stress – hair loss around her tail – and our intention was not to stress but to help. Can she live a happy life in a household while never being a part of it?


Feral Mama Cat and Her Four Kittens to Feral Cats

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Feral Mama Cat and Her Four Kittens

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Dec 17, 2009 Hope and Patience
by: Jan Plant

What a kind family you all are. Adopting and neutering ferals is not cheap, and doing it is a wonderful thing. Allowing the “stand off” her own space and respect will gain her trust quicker,then forcing her. Some take a long time. And again, some never take to human contact at all. If she’s interacting with the other cats and feeding and doing other “crazy’ cat things,I wouldn’t worry much. But if she goes off and stays off by herself,and refuses even cat company,you may want to have your vet look at her.

I put a benydryl in some milk and stood and watched while only allowing certain ones to drink the milk.It really mellowed them out, didn’t harm them and wearing welders gloves I put them in the crate for their trip to the vet. Ask your vet if you should do this, mine said it was okay, but not to give to a sick or unhealthy cat. But you never know unless you ask. Good luck. You and yours are in my prayers.

Nov 21, 2009 What a great cat story!
by: Ruth Y.

It is wonderful that you were able to help the mama cat and her kittens. Not everyone would be able or willing to take all those cats into their home as you have done. I hope that food, patience and love will eventually win over the one kitten. It seems odd that her siblings adjusted, but she did not.

My own adopted feral cat, Monty, used to do that silent meow. Over time he became more vocal, because I’m so vocal– always talking and singing to him. You might try singing to her– it sounds silly, but Monty likes it. I always sing to him when I feed him. Maybe you could sing softly to her whenever you put food down for her. Assuming no neurological problems, this might be another small thing you could do to help her adjust to being around humans.

I think the silent meow might be how the feral kitten communicates, because being too vocal might attract a predator. Maybe over time, your kitten will adjust like the others and become less stressed out, more vocal and affectionate. However, every cat is different. My sister’s cat, Kobe, is very skittish and nervous around strangers. It took him years to adjust to my presence– and I visit almost every day! But now he lets me pet him. Maybe that one kitten is just like Kobe– a special case.

Nov 19, 2009 find a program
by: kathy

I would suggest looking in your area for a spay program. I dont know where you live but in my area there is a program called Spay and Stay. You trap the feral cat in one of their traps and then you take it in on a spay day and they do multiple spay and nueturs. Then you take the cat back home and its released. They help people manage their feral colonies. They have workshops and education programs. I adopted our Midnight through their program. I trapped her and took her to the Spay date at a local vet. I believed they steralized about 85 cats on that day. They charge about 25.00 and they steralize, give them their vacinations including rabies, and then they put flea protection on them along with worming them. We kept her in for the 48 hrs required by their program and she didnt seem like she wanted to go back outside so we just kept her. She also had 4 kitties when she was found. She is part of our family now. Good Luck with your feral kitty.

Nov 14, 2009 cats
by: Ruth aka Kattaddorra

It sounds as if mama cat was an abandoned cat rather than a feral as she would have been wild and very protective of her kittens and very hard to persuade indoors.
The little unfriendly mute kitten may have neurological problems,maybe the vet can give her a close examination when she goes in to be spayed.It’s worrying she’s lost hair and you are right, it’s a sign of stress. If the vet finds she’s healthy it could be that she has a feral father and would be happier outdoors if she had a warm safe place to go and was fed.
But having said that,some cats just don’t like to be petted but she may improve with time and become friendlier.Yes cats can live happily in a household but not be part of it,but it’s a shame they miss out on the love isn’t it ?
Napolean must be a lovely cat, to be so kind to the others,whoever had him declawed on all four paws was a very cruel person.
You are my sort of person, taking in a declawed cat and this litle family too and spending all that money on them !! I hope it all works out well eventually.


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