Is My Cat A RagaMuffin?

Is My Cat A RagaMuffin?

by Camilla
(London, UK)

Hi...I have a cat and he has very long hair round his face, in his ears and on his tummy extending to the back of his hind legs. I have been trying to see what breed he is closet to and the RagaMuffin seems to fit the description.

He was undernourished as a kitten so he quite small and has extremely small head and large eyes.

Picture attached....


Hi Camilla..... thanks for popping by the website. You may have seen other pages from other visitors who ask the same question but about different breeds. I responded to a similar question about a Maine Coon cat yesterday.

I usually say that if a cat caretaker does not have certificates that establish that their cat is purebred then it is not purebred (and therefore a cat breed) technically even though the cat is purebred. It is all about certification. But that is not really the whole story.

It could be argued that some feral cats are purebred (without certificates of course) if they have been created on an island from a few founding cats (the Manx is an example).

Anyway, the bottom line is probably this. Your cat is probably a DLH - domestic long haired cat of random breeding. But I could be wrong. It is simply not possible to decide a cat breed conclusively from a photograph alone as some purebred cats will be poor examples when compared to the breed standard but will still be purebred and therefore a breed of cat albeit unregistered.

Your cat is very nice looking. You are the first, I think, from London, to ask this question. As you might know I too live in London.

Someone else might well respond better than me.

Michael Avatar

Is My Cat A RagaMuffin? to RagaMuffin cat

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Is My Cat A RagaMuffin?

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Dec 09, 2010
ID ragmuffin
by: patrick

surfing web to find breed of cat that has "stubby" legs. Found term "ragmuffin" which eventually got me here.I originally thought she was lynx-point but her ears have softened as she was fed. She is whinning now--before rarely she had a little "bark". I think she has been traumatized, abandoned and abused. I noticed the legs. Her coat is medium, brown color tabby. The "voice" and stubby leggs and perky ears got me to wondering about "breed". And I agree, breed only is a relevant point with purebreds. But again, looking up genetic weaknesses and common disorders can be useful.

Apr 05, 2010
Maine Coon?
by: Lisa

I hope you know that Ragmuffins are quite rare but its does look likef he has a bit of Ragmuffin =D to me he looks more like a moggie or even a Maine Coon. that all i know but hope i helped =D


Mar 16, 2010
by: Anonymous

He was acquired in poor condition when he was a year old by my boyfriend, advertised as a ragdoll by a family who could no longer afford to keep him. He clearly isn't a ragdoll, but I thought they may have been confused with a Ragamuffin.

He has many characteristics including the friendliness and ability to do tricks etc but does not go limp when picked up.

I am not really concerned by breed, I have always wanted a friendly lap cat and he certainly meets the criteria.

Mar 16, 2010
Great look
by: Finn Frode, denmark

Hi Camilla. You say he was undernourished as a kitten, which indicates that you probably found him as a stray, got him from a shelter or similar humble beginnings? The chance of a purebred kitten ending up in that situation is rather slim, let alone a RagaMuffin, which I believe to be a rare breed in Britain.

As Michael suggests, he is probably a mixed breed - and it is almost impossible to determine what's in a mix. Here in Denmark a kitten like him most likely would have a father or a grandparent of Norwegian Forest cat origin. They are quite common in the UK too, but that of course is purely guessing...

Whatever he is, he is a great looking cat and no doubt very affectionate. And if he was mine I would not hesitate to call him "Muffin" anyhow. 😉

Finn Frode avatar

Mar 15, 2010
Hi Dorothy
by: Michael

I too had thought about DNA testing and in fact suggested it concerning a feral cat that looked like a Bengal cat (in Australia) but although there are DNA tests that can isolate certain categories I don't think that is, as yet, a DNA profile for any specific cat breed against which a DNA test can be compared to assess the breed.

One day it will no doubt be possible, however. It would be very useful.

The most common use of DNA testing in the cat world is for genetic diseases such as PKD in Maine Coon cats, for example. There are genetic markers that tell us if a cat is predisposed to diseases that occur more frequently in certain breeds.

The purpose is to allow breeders to stop breeding from cats that are carrying the defective gene and so reduce the overall incidence of the disease in the breed.

Michael Avatar

Mar 15, 2010
Regarding 'typing' a cat to Michael
by: Dorothy

I laughed at your Main Coonish comment earlier. I know this issue comes up again and again here on the POC. I recently learned that there is an inexpensive DNA test that can be done on dogs to find out their breed, or breeds as is usually the case. I wonder if there is the same for a cat? Usually, it is nothing more than taking a saliva sample from the cheek. Something to look into I think. I recall the DNA test for dogs only ran about $50 bucks. If I were a better person, I'd research it again before commenting, but alas....I have enough to think about giving Bigfoot antibiotics twice a day for three weeks. He hates me for an hour after.

Best to all, as always.


PS Camilla, your cat is beautiful whatever breed he is.


Is My Cat A RagaMuffin? — 2 Comments

  1. I had a cat from a shelter long ago, it looked exactly like yours, I thought someone had stolen my picture, when I saw that. this cat is probably a Siberian or half Siberian.
    the picture is from the internet, Siberian breeders, but looks exactly like my former cat

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