My Pet African Wildcat

My Pet African Wildcat

by lainie
( USA)

African wildcat, Okavango Delta - Photo by randomtruth and added by Michael to illustrate the page.

African wildcat, Okavango Delta - Photo by randomtruth and added by Michael to illustrate the page.

I have a female African wildcat that was born in Saudi Arabia. My brother was stationed there and captured her parents, as kittens, in the desert outside Dhahran and AlKhobar. She was a kitten when she came here to the US. She is quite tame and is a great house cat.

I bred her to a Siamese since there were no other african wildcats to breed her to. She had 3 of the most wonderful kittens. I would love to find another African wildcat to breed her to.

I think this breed makes quite a great pet despite the name... they are not wild if raised in a loving home. And they are strikingly beautiful.

lainie

Comments for
My Pet African Wildcat

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Apr 20, 2011 thank you
by: kymbreleigh

She is so beautiful


Feb 12, 2011 my pet african wildcat
by: cat breed

ugly bat boy they need turn that into breed of cat it looks like a lion i think that breed will be popular in future i want one the owner should breed it he says lot of wildcat in area looks like him in new hampshire it looks like maine coon and sphynx mix with a lion mane and it can stop people from having lion as pets


Dec 13, 2010 African wild cat species
by: Wild cat owner

This picture is of the African wild cat species called Felis Silvestris Lybica. There are several African wild cat species i.e; lion, leopard, serval, caracal, jungle cat, black footed cat, sand cat.

It is very hard to tame a true wild cat species. In most instances, the cat must be a very young kitten and bottle fed by the human and this is never a guarantee the cat will become tame. Also, these cats still possess their wild cat traits such as spraying to mark their territory. Their urine is extremely strong and smelly.
They also require a special diet. They should be fed a raw meat diet with special vitamins added. In my opinion, only those who know exactly what they are getting into and preferably have experience working with wild cats should attempt to obtain a wild cat as a pet.

Wild cats are a lot of work and a life time commitment not to mention most places require a special wildlife permit to own one. Many places flat out ban the ownership and it is illegal to possess one.

Thoughts to ponder...


Dec 10, 2010 my pet african wildcat
by: mainecoon

that not a sand cat/ i want to buy african wildcat there tip tape tail is cool they have a cool coat i want to breed won witn a persian cat so that it look like pallas cat i herd that african wildcat is tamer than most house cat and herd europian wildcat is on tameble and is dangerous


Dec 01, 2010 Which species of African wild cat?
by: Anonymous

Since your cat was captured in Saudi Arabia, are you absolutely certain it is not a Sand Cat? The sands cats (felis margarita) are native to the Middle East and North Africa. I've heard rumors that they were being used as target practice by humans during the Desert Storm war. How sad. They are one of the smallest wild cat species that exist, weighing only 4-7 pounds max. I think the sand cat is one of the most beautiful of the small wild cat species.


Aug 02, 2010 No worries.
by: Anonymous

They are not actually endangered... They are so common there are still people that hunt them for game, so no worries there.

I actually have one myself, it was found as a stray wandering around and rescued by the humane society. We brought him to the vet after and they gave us the 'low-down' on the breed.

He is... A handful. I do not suggest this cat to inexperienced owners. Nonetheless we love him.


Nov 19, 2009 Sorry
by: Michael (PoC Admin)

Sorry about the typo in the title ("Afican") that was there for about 6 hours. I was in a mad rush yesterday so didn't get a chance to check and I have become word blind! The typo was mine I believe as I changed the title. All is well now.


Nov 18, 2009 Never Tell Anyone Or. . .
by:

Since you now own an endangered specie, violations of the Lacey Act have been done, I would strongly NOT tell anyone NOT even the vet what she actually is. You would have your state Game & Wildlife on your door step in a heart beat. IF your NOT Federally licensed in plain terms, your up the creek without a paddle. I would rather you either have this article removed for the safety of the animal and never tell anyone of her origins. Violations of Lacey Act are heavy fines of well over $2,ooo or more and that is for people with permits.


Nov 18, 2009 Pleased
by: Michael

Hi, I am very pleased that you have shared this experience with us. It is a first. It is nice to hear first hand how the African wildcat behaves when domesticated. It seems that this cat is just waiting to be domesticated; almost behaving like a feral cat!



Comments

My Pet African Wildcat — 3 Comments

  1. Shame I had my big man fixed. There is an egyptian cattery specializing in the purebreeding of felis sylvestris lybica. The former comments are indeed correct. He is a handful, to say the least. A constant battle for dominance. Yet he exhibits the same affection as any other domestic breed of housecat. Getting him at 9 weeks probably helped as well. I woulda loved to stud him out, but then again, the spraying…nope. And, he’s toilet trained :)))

  2. I got my cat at the pound. It was 18 mos. old. It was newly neutered and from her appearance was to give birth shortly. She was called Tiger because of her markings. All the pictures on the internet look exactly like her. Including white tipped pawls and chest. Still displays wild tendencies.Didn’t sit in my lap for over a year and not for long at that. Like to observe her wild nature. Let outdoors and she runs off racoons and other cats.

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