Persian cat type – Response to your article

Persian cat type – Response to your article

by Carol Trevelyan-Knox
(UK)

GRC Risingmoon Eye Candy

GRC Risingmoon Eye Candy

A lot of nonsense is talked about ultra type persians. There is a difference here in the UK between ultra type and extreme type; extreme type that you may have in the USA is not allowed for here in the GCCF SOP.

ALL breed types change over 100 years! I have bred pugs and they look nothing like what they used to do 100 years ago. The breeds that change less are HORSES for example. This is because they only have one baby at a time, so change is much slower. As cats have many kittens and litters, change is fast forwarded, especially if you have a dedicated band of followers. Look at the siamese! If they did not change we would all be showing the same cat.

As for health issues I entirely agree with you, but one of the main health issues NEVER comes up!

The higher nose placement and flatter face has made the persian look more baby like, and less piggy and ugly with face gutters which soil and stain.(the traditional cat is quite ugly to me). The trick is to breed the ultra type with a very open face. I have attached a pic of one of mine. The only persian I have with breathing and snuffling problems is a traditional type long nosed persian.

I think the more frightening health issue that never comes up IS driven by the show fraternity, judges and exhibitors. What is it? It's the increase in the volume and length of coat. My vet is sick of the numbers of persians that come in and have to be sedated to be dematted.

The persian has now got to a point where it cannot live naturally because of its coat, many persian owners cannot manage it. Whilst we breeder/exhibitors are dedicated to keeping our cats pristine and beautiful, it is far too much for many owners to cope with, or the cat to cope with. I have tried showing cats with less coats, but they are overlooked no matter how good the cat, for a cat with a huge coat.

In my mind any persian with a huge coat, expertly groomed can go to the highest awards, but I think it is time to step back and choose for the less dense and shorter coats for the sake of the persian cat. Only a few are in the hands of show/breeders, the rest are suffering out there, being shaved etc. I have attached a picture of one of my cats with a shorter but beautiful quality coat, who also managed to be a TICA cat of the year 2007.

What do other persian breeders think, will there be an outcry, do you love the huge coats? I definitely feel guilty about it.

Carol Trevelyan-Knox

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Persian cat type - Response to your article

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Sep 11, 2011 Agree
by: Michael

I fully agree with the last comment from Anonymous. The standard does shift it seems because is lacks precision. I guess it has to because we are dealing with animals and not machines, although you might be mistaken sometimes.

This flexibility allows judges to direct the course of development of the breed and then breeders chase awards and you get a circuitous behaviour that leads to change in the cat's appearance.

And as you say, what is remarkable is that after all this "refinement" and selective breeding we have a cat that is less healthy and less attractive. Very strange.

Cat associations need better management and better thinking that is wider and more enlightened, I believe. The cat fancy is too bound up in its own world unable to see the bigger picture.

I respect other people's views however.


Sep 10, 2011 Comment on "standard."
by: Anonymous

What exactly is meant by "standard?"

Doesn't a "standard," by any measure, pertain to something that is predictable, and stays the same, over time?

The "standard" units of measure (in the U.S.A.) are inches, feet, and yards.

An inch is always an inch. A foot always has 12 inches. Not 11 or 13, depending on the whimsy of a judge.

A yard is always three feet.

If the "standard" of cat (or dog) breeds is subject to change, how can it be called a "standard."

In your article you state:

"However, throughout this period of development and change, up until the 1980s the Persian Breed Standard had remained almost unchanged (since the acceptance of the breed in the late 1800s - i.e. over a 100 year period)."

Isn't that the point of a standard? For it to remain unchanged?

A previous poster, and show cat breeder, stated that everyone would be showing the "same cats" if the standard didn't change.

I find this thinking circuitous and self serving.

I think the current incarnation of the Persion is ugly. Instead of having a pleasant expression, it looks unhappy and mean.

Then again, if I looked like my head was smashed into a wall, I wouldn't have a happy expression, either.

I find it distressing that the matting of the coat was the point of concern of the first commenter.

Personally, I believe that anyone who isn't prepared to put the work and energy into keeping such a coat (whether it is a cat or a dog) shouldn't have that animal. It isn't fair to the animal to have to suffer from a human's laziness and lack of concern for the animal's well being and comfort.

One of the "requirements" of the "standard" is that the cat "rests" between bouts of activity.

With such an extreme brachocephalic head and decreased breathing ability, the cat has no choice.

It can't breathe well enough to sustain activity for long.

Please, start breeding the Persion cat back to the "traditional" conformation.

The "traditional" Persion is adorable and has a pleasant expression.

More than that, the cat can breathe as nature intended.

Stop cowtowing to the whimsy of judges and breed healthy, happy animals.


Feb 14, 2011 Misunderstood
by: Anonymous

First of all, I find very offensive the part about Persians named "stupid". A lack of a muzzle doesn't mean a lack of intelligence. Their "placid nature" can be related to this: long, thick coat points to a cold habitat - obviously, they originate from a cold, mountainous place, so a natural thing to every organism when living in cold conditions, is hibernation - to save precious energy.


Dec 25, 2010 Self serving article
by: Anonymous

Can't be taken seriously, for that reason.


Oct 19, 2010 HOW TRUE
by: CAROLE STANAWAY

What very interting reading Carol I totally agree on all points. I have shown for over 30 years
and love grooming persians and keep my cats show and pet in perfect condition, but for the ordinary pet owner big coats are a no!no! and it isn't right for this lovely breed to be sedated every time it's coat becomes matted.

I have one of your beautiful cats with a lovely coat which isn't huge but always looks wonderful even when she has shed some of her coat. She has a beautiful persian type and a very sweet expression and doesn't suffer from runny eyes or a snuffly nose,

Regards Carole


Oct 19, 2010 HOW TRUE
by: CAROLE STANAWAY

What very interting reading Carol I totally agree on all points. I have shown for over 30 years
and love grooming persians and keep my cats show and pet in perfect condition, but for the ordinary pet owner big coats are a no!no! and it isn't right for this lovely breed to be sedated every time it's coat becomes matted.

I have one of your beautiful cats with a lovely coat which isn't huge but always looks wonderful even when she has shed some of her coat. She has a beautiful persian type and a very sweet expression and doesn't suffer from runny eyes or a snuffly nose,


Jan 04, 2008 Great post
by: Michael

Carol

I hope you read this. Thanks for a really useful posting and for the time to do it.

I have linked to this page from the Persian Cats page (near the top of the page) to extend the discussion.

Regards
Michael
Admin



Comments

Persian cat type – Response to your article — 2 Comments

  1. I am the original poster and this farm has no connection to me, and is a stumbled upon link …. so the poster that believes anyone that owns a longhaired cat might realise, everything is not as it seems. The cat in question here probably does not have a coat that a ‘show’ persian cat would have; and most kittens from show breeders are homed as pets.
    http://www.risingmoonfarm.com/2007/06/862/

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