Rex Kitten from Sphynx Breeding?

by Karen Marlatt
(Jacksonville, Florida USA)

Hello! I found your website while doing some research. We bred our Sphynx female (Isis) to our Sphynx male (Anubis).

On August 17, Isis presented us with six gorgeous little boys. Five of them are obviously Sphynx kittens, but one of them (the last to be born) has a coat of fine, kinky hair.

It’s not just on parts of his body; he has a full coat of kinky hair. His physical build is identical to his brothers.

I’ve read that Sphynx breeders occasionally used Devon Rex cats years ago, but it was quite a surprise to see this beautiful baby.

What do you think of this? Any help you can give me will be appreciated.

Update (after comments added):

Here is a picture of the little guy, the Devon Rex offspring of two Sphynx cat parents:

Karen


Hi Karen.. thanks for visiting and asking. And thanks of bringing this interesting topic to PoC.

I had never heard of this until you mentioned it. I checked out Robinson’s Genetics for Cat Breeders and Veterinarians (4th ed). and on page 180 they say this:

“In fact the similarity of the Sphynx to the Devon Rex induced breeders to cross the two breeds, a practice which led to the finding that the Sphynx hairlessness is dominant to the rex coat.”

Interestingly TICA breed standard says that permissible outcrosses are: American Shorthair, Devon Rex. So it still happens.

The recessive gene of the rex cat is usually unseen because as stated the Sphynx hairless gene (hr) is dominant to the rex gene (re)

The Devon Rex gene is recessive also. It looks as though what has happened is what you inferred, namely the subservient recessive gene of the rex has come through and revealed itself in one kitten. It seems you have a Devon Rex in a Sphynx body. A special kind of Devon Rex born to Sphynx parents.

I would be very pleased if you could upload a photo or two so we can all see. Just use the same form, make a short note and I’ll add the photo to this page.

For visitors who would like to see these two breeds side by side, here they are:

Best

Michael Avatar

From Rex Kitten from Sphynx Breeding? to Devon Rex Cat

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Rex Kitten from Sphynx Breeding?

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Sep 14, 2010
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by: Karen

Hi Karen, I managed to upload the pic of Eddie. But the pics of the parents were too small to be of any use.

Please try again with larger images if you like.

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Michael Avatar


Sep 14, 2010
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by: Michael

Hi Karen,

To upload photos go to any input form on the website and upload them with some info. I’ll put them on the page.

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Michael


Sep 14, 2010
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Photo of Devon Rex Kitten from Sphynx Parents
by: Karen Marlatt

Hi Michael,

Thank you SO much for confirming what I suspected. I’d tried to attach photos when I originally posted but they were too big. Let me try again:

Hmmm, I can’t see how to attach a photo here. Please forgive me, I am not too swift with technology! I’ll look for another way to do it.



Comments

Rex Kitten from Sphynx Breeding? — 6 Comments

  1. Hi Karen,
    I have a little mutation just like yours! My kitten was born to a sphynx mother and a sphynx father and has a coat of short, curly hair. She is wonderful and special and I’ve been wondering how to preserve her unique traits of a sphynx personality with a velveteen coat of non-shedding hair. She is four months old and I am considering breeding her, but have no idea what a good match would be. Michael, do you have any suggestions?

    • Hi Regina. Sweet cat and nice photograph. I don’t really have a suggestion from the top of my head. I’ll see if I can get a colleague to comment. Thanks for sharing.

  2. This seems to be variability of the gene that causes Sphynx hairlessness; the coat can vary naturally from hairless through to a light fuzz. The gene is very closely related to Devon Rex and sometimes the various other genes in the mix that affect fur get expressed to some degree.

    Normally to perpetuate a new mutation, you backcross the cat to its opposite sex parent. Some of the offspring should display the mutation. That also saves introducing unknowns into the genetic mix.

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