The Christmas tree is the perfect present for your cat

Cat owners should not be annoyed or surprised if their cat disturbs (at the very least) their carefully prepared Christmas tree. This is not bad cat behavior. This is not about a cat being mischievous. It’s just that for a cat, particularly an indoor cat who might be slightly bored, the installation of a Christmas tree with those dangly things is an opportunity for entertainment. It is as if you had bought the tree for her.

Cat in Christmas tree

Cat in Christmas tree. Photo: @KTM12XU.

If it’s a real tree it will have the fragrance and scent of an outdoor object which is bound to stimulate interest. Then of course it is something completely new and we know that cats will always explore something new. Their inquisitiveness is legendary.

If the trunk of the Christmas tree is wide enough and there is access to it then it might become an ideal scratching post. The dangly things are cat toys to be knocked off and batted away.

If there is space at the top it makes a lovely perch. We know that cats like to move vertically. We know that cats like to be in high places. Here is an opportunity, rarely presented, to explore a brand-new object that smells like nature and which allows a cat to climb, and my God cats like to climb.

So we shouldn’t be disturbed or upset if a cat interferes with the tree. Although I am sure that many cat owners will find some ways to protect their tree from their cat or tick off their cat for climbing it. But please don’t punish your cat. Never. Accept it and take some precautions.

There are some potentially dangerous things on Christmas trees like cords and tinselly bits which a cat might ingest so some obvious precautions need to be taken to protect the family cat.

In fact there will be tons of paper and small objects lying around the floor as well on Christmas Day in the home where there are children. Some of these objects such as fine threads are particularly dangerous to an inquisitive cat. We all know that cats like to put stuff into their mouths and chew it. Threads can get caught on the tongue, in the mouth and down the throat and it can be hard to see. Extra care is needed. You don’t want a massive veterinary bill at Christmas and a deeply upset cat.

Proactive cat caretaking and acceptance of natural cat behavior are the watch words for cat owners at Christmas.

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The Christmas tree is the perfect present for your cat — 4 Comments

  1. My brother had a cat (Midget) who loved to climb the Christmas tree and bat the shiny balls around. Brother never put tinsel on the tree nor garland for the reasons presented. He and his wife also only used plastic bulbs in case the cat knocked the bulb off the tree. Funny that the cat never showed any interest in wires, but sat in front of the tree for hours watching the blinking lights. He never tried batting at those. Since it was a real tree, brother covered up the water in the pot securely with a skirt so the cat couldn’t drink it. When bedtime came, he’d close the door to avoid access by the cat and the lights were off. Only when the adults were in the room was the cat allowed access to the tree. He’d just happily climb the tree, sniff it and sit on a high branch like he was on top of the world! Warm memories.

  2. When I first discovered that cats loved Christmas time and all the decorations and presents and merriment, I was aghast. They’re just like kids, sort of. I never had a tree large enough that a cat could limb though. I remember too that what I didn’t know could have killed my cats… AbbyandSadiesMom said it… tinsel ! If/when they swallow that it could wind every which way in it’s intestines and cut and bind them! Even if an end of it makes it out the back end, if you pull it, it could easily slice up her insides and she’ll bleed internally and die before you can get her to the hospital… and on Christmas no less. I shudder that it’s still used, like glass ornaments. How cats survived these things until now I don’t know. I guess many died.

    • Thanks Albert for reminding all of us of the dangers of tinsel and garland. You’re right, it’s amazing that cats have survived the holidays as long as they have. Sadly, some probably did not.

      On a happier note, with Midget, we gave him gifts too. He’d watch us as we tore into our presents. When we gave him his presents, he’d first look at us for approval. Upon saying “It’s OK, go ahead.” he’d just exercise those claws and rip the bejeepers out of the paper. He’d find stuff like catnip-laced toys, a turbo-round (that round plastic thing with the corrugated cardboard scratcher in the center and the toy on the edge), perhaps a new food dish). Such joy! That was one spoiled feline, lol!

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