HomeCat FancyCat Breeding100% spay and neuter will cause problems

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100% spay and neuter will cause problems — 6 Comments

  1. I like your comment, Ruth.

    The same was true for me as a kid. I had no idea there were pet slaughter houses. I think I heard the words “dog pound” from a cartoon but really didn’t know what that meant for a long time.

    My family always had multiple pets – cats, dogs, even rabbits. And, several of our cats came from farms too. Many things about pets were more acceptable then. In our neighborhood, we all knew each others’ cats, watched out for them, never complained about them.

  2. I think you will always have some barn cats reproducing because the mom teaching her kittens to hunt is the most effective mouser, or so I have been told. If people want a pet cat they should travel to a farm. There should be no shelters, no unwanted cats, no cats tossed away. The only cats reproducing should be barn cats or cats of people who intend to keep the kittens or already have homes in mind for them. Anyone who doesn’t want kittens should get their cat altered. Once a person takes a pet cat it should be for life. The only wild cats would be barn cats, and since farms would be the primary source of pet cats, barn cat populations would be kept in check.

    This is how I thought the world was, for the most part, when I was a child. I didn’t know there were animal shelters or that unwanted pets were being slaughtered daily. When we wanted a cat, we went to the farm during kitten season and caught a kitten. We never saw cats in cages. It’s not that it wasn’t happening. I just didn’t know. And why would I expect it? The way humans treat their cats is insane– don’t spay or neuter but have no plan for dealing with unwanted kittens, toss a cat away when you’re tired of it, let them go outside in high traffic, congested city areas with no supervision… If everybody actually cared about their cats we wouldn’t have shelters, an overpopulation of cats and so many feral and stray cats.

    • Well said Ruth. If barn cats were the only source of kittens then that would definitely suit me. Far more natural. As you say the idea of shelters, which are not in fact shelters but cat rehoming and killing facilities, are an admission of failure in our management of the domestic cat.

      Ideally there should be some real management of neutering and spaying too. Willy-nilly spaying and neutering is rather crude. Cat breeders care vary careful as to which cats are neutered or spayed.

  3. Imagine a world without cats how horrible that would be.
    Neutering has its place and it will be a long time before every cat owner has every cat neutered but like you said Micheal breeders will still breed so what then if there was no more ordinary moggies ordinary people who love cats wouldn’t be able to have a cat as most couldn’t afford to pay for a pedigree cat.

  4. This thought provoking article struck a chord with me Michael because I have often pondered about this and how if all cats were neutered (which covers both sexes, females spayed, males castrated) there would eventually be no kittens born at all and the wonderful species would become extinct.
    Of course as you say it won’t happen because everyone doesn’t have their cat neutered and there are still too many being killed for lack of homes. We need to strike the happy medium, with humans as well as cats. Nature took care of the number of humans before IVF treatments were invented and took care of the number of cats surviving when they were in the wild but we have taken over and we don’t do such a good job!

    • I am pleased you are on the same wavelength about this. Rightly so, there is a big drive to make sure cats are spayed and neutered but if this is followed through to conclusion it would be dire. Not that I am saying governments and rescue organisations should not promote the idea of sterilization of cats. But the whole picture should be considered. It isn’t as straightforward as some make out.

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