HomeCat Newscat rescueAt 19, she is Britain’s oldest rescue cat and she needs a new home

Comments

At 19, she is Britain’s oldest rescue cat and she needs a new home — 15 Comments

  1. She looks in better shape at 19 than Holly did. Pops doesn’t seem to have that ‘dip’ in the spine that a lot of geriatric cats seem to develop.

    I hadn’t noticed her eyes. Mine were drawn to that tiny little pink growth on the left handside of her muzzle. I wonder if that’s some kind of benign cyst?

    She is lovely isn’t she. There’s something about older cats which always makes me melt. Kittens are cute, but they don’t do it for me anymore. Pops deserves to be the sole cat in the home where she can be cherished in her remaining years.

  2. She’s a real cutie and petite too. Poor eyesight aside, she doesn’t look in too bad a condition for a cat of 19. My Holly, also a tortoishell and white, had quite a bit of grey fur around her muzzle by the time she was 19. I hope it doesn’t take too much longer for her to be found a home.

    • I don’t think that she looks her age. Do you?
      She doesn’t seem to have a lot of muscle mass loss and looks alert in spite of her poor eyesight.
      Does it look like a cataract in her right eye or just a degenerative condition?
      All would be OK with me.
      I would love to see a video of her walk to see how arthritic she may be. That could be helped.

      Oh god, in a fast heartbeat would I care and love her…

      • I am the same as you Dee. I feel for her. I am also minded to adopt her but I don’t think I can do one way and another.

  3. If I could, I would…
    Beautiful old girl.
    I don’t like the speculation that an elderly lady abandoned her because she couldn’t care for her any longer. Even here, there are better alternatives.

    • Cats Protection also speculated that she may have had an elderly owner who died and the relatives ‘forgot’ about the cat 🙁

      Either way, it’s very sad that such an elderly cat should be just turned loose to fend for themselves. As Dee rightly said, there are always better alternatives than just abandoning animals to their fate.

      • Can you even fathom, Michele, that this girl could have been “forgotten”?
        Maybe, we really are a minority.

        • Whatever the reason, there’s no justification for abandoning that cat.

          If the owner died, what horrible bunch of friends and relatives. How could they not know that a pet of 19 years probably meant a lot to the deceased, who when alive would have been distressed to think of their elderly cat all alone. It was cruel to dump the cat and disrespectful to the deceased.

          If somebody living dumped that cat…. just hope our paths never cross 😉

  4. She’s a real sweetie. I don’t know why people are so reluctant to adopt senior cats. Is it because they think they’ll die soon? I’ve had young ones die from birth defects, eleven months old and 15 months. Life is a crap shoot. Love them while you can.

    My Samirah is 15. Her eyes are a little cloudy, but she recently passed her senior wellness exam with flying colors. The vet was amazed. He didn’t think she would be that healthy. Just being in a loving home and not a pen would most likely give poor Pops a boost.

    • I am very fond of elderly cats. But there is the double whammy “problems” of ill health and death. Both are traumatic to deal with. There is the cost of vet’s bills too. It is a tough one.

      • I agree, Michael, but my attitude has changed due to having two young male cats die in my care from hidden birth defects within 5 years of each other. A young cat can sicken and even die just like an elderly cat can.

  5. I’ve shared Pop’s with the hope someone may be able to give her the best twilight years a little cat could wish for.

    What a shame that CP can’t find a kind foster for her, life in a pen must be miserable for her.

    Elderly cats are a joy to care for, they give far more than they ever take.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.