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Cat Teeth — 28 Comments

  1. My 8 mo old Scottish fold straight has a crooked lower jaw. One canine outside of his mouth. Has made a callous on his upper lip. His small teeth in the front not straight and looks like another one coming in Back of them . What should I do. He eats ok.

    • I wonder if the crooked jaw is a result of the genetic deficiency which causes the folded ears? It is not strictly relevant. My gut feeling is that if your cat is healthy and eating well then the condition that you describe is not important. It appears to be an anatomical deformity which happen sometimes. The most famous anatomical deformity amongst all cats is the face of Grumpy Cat. When cat breeders get it wrong they sometimes breed cats with malformed jaws. This can be due to inbreeding. Like I say if your cat is healthy and eating well then I would suggest that you accept it. In any case there is little that can be done about it as far as I can see. I am not a veterinarian. Thanks for commenting, Julie. Best of luck.

  2. My Maine coon started drooling intensively. He’s 2 years old. Hes eating and drinking well. It happens mostly when he sleeps. We’re talking a lot of drool. Why?

    • Hi Deborah. I have a page on cat drooling:

      https://pictures-of-cats.org/cat-drooling.html

      It may assist. Your cat is young. Sometimes drooling is not a symptom of ill-health. It might be a characteristic of the cat. However, you say it is intense. It can’t be about poor oral health. An underlying disease is a possibility. Or perhaps a foreign body in the mouth. But my gut feel is that your cat is healthy and his drooling is just the way he is. I am guessing big time though.

  3. My adult cats one canine is a quarter inch longer than the other. It is turning dark grey in color near the gum line. What is going on?

    • Hi Arlene. Sorry I don’t know what is going on. I have to be honest with you. I’ll check and if I find an answer I’ll leave another response. Thanks for commenting.

  4. Thanks for any info as I have a beloved rescue kitten and he/Binx seems to be missing his bottom teeth. Doesn’t stop him from eating his food, or chewing on things-like me-but it was his chewing that concerned me. He likes to chew on my baby finger and sometimes he sounds like he is sucking. He was a pretty sick boy when we got him, but definitely not now and wondered if this was a cause of the missing teeth. He does have his canines.

    • Hi Julie, it sounds like he lost his teeth as you suggest when he was a sick boy. Is a rescue cat and was he rescued after a tough life? If that is the case it would probably explain loss of teeth. He may have had very poor dental health and a vet removed his teeth. Then he was adopted by you. Just a wild guess. We know that vets often remove teeth when dealing with feline oral health issues.

  5. MY 5 MONTH OLD KITTEN’S LEFT UPPER CANINE IS COMPLETELY SIDE WAYS AND COVERING ONE OR
    TWO OF HIS TOP TEETH.

    WONDERING IF THIS UPPER CANINE TOOTH WILL JUST FALL OUT OR SHOULD BE EXTRACTED.

    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR ANY INFO YOU GIVE ME.

    MARILYNE

    • Hi Marilyn, it seems to be a retained baby tooth that needs now to be extracted as it has not disappeared of its own accord. I’d see a vet asap as it may cause long term problems. Good luck and thanks for visiting.

  6. My kitten (roughly 5 months) was crunching and pawing at his mouth the other day. I was alarmed when the tooth that fell out looked like a row of teeth. Although having looked on your website I can now see that the premolars are a ‘point’ with a small point either side. It was a good picture to refer to, so thank you for that.

  7. Michael,

    Do you know what the largest domestic cat canine teeth size is? My cat has canines that measure 2/3 of an inch from the gums.
    I was just curious if you had any insight into the record for feline canine tooth size, because I have not found another domestic cat with teeth of this size, excluding servals.

    Thank you,
    Chaz

    • Awesome is all I can say! 😉 I have not discussed canine tooth length except when writing about the sabre tooth tiger. Your cat comes close….! I might do something on this. It is an interesting and fun cat topic. Thanks for sharing.

      • My cat is huge about 20 lbs or more and his teeth are bigger than this. Is this normal or is there something wrong. He doesn’t scratch he is a biter and he bites to take down the kill but is an inside cat! He stalks us sometimes. He is a huge orange and white male.

        • Hi Kyla. Your cat is indeed very large. Therefore his teeth are probably longer than normal. There is no definitive, proscribed length for cat teeth including of course the canine teeth at the front and sides. When I’m saying is that a cat’s teeth can vary in length within certain limits. Indeed, my girlfriend looks after a small black cat who has very long canine teeth on her upper jaw which are very noticeable when her mouth is closed. They are exceptionally long but quite normal. Your cat has long, noticeable teeth too. The probably look a bit intimidating 😉 .

          • I have an 18 month old male, Russian Blue (Marshall) that is very similar in size to Kyla’s kitty (Nov 2015). He’s not 20 pounds (yet!) but 15 pounds. We got him at five months old and know very little of his past. He was constantly, literally sinking his teeth into our hands/arms. After acquiring another, older/smaller/female cat (Lilly) we concluded that he was playing. She’s about five or six and can take him down, but sometimes she’s more passive and he gets the best of her. I worry about him harming her. He gets her by the neck. I haven’t found any damage to her skin but sometimes she loses a tuft of hair. Before he attacks her, he cries out in the same way he would before he attacked me. If I’m nearby, I try to deter him by saying, “Mashall, play nice” and sometimes he will back off. His cry is scary sounding! Should I be concerned?

            • Hi Londa. I think if I was in your shoes I’d be asking the same question. He is a bit too aggressive for me. It looks like he has not learned the boundaries of play. I believe the rough play will subside. But it would be nice to try and train him to play more gently. I think it can be quite hard to achieve that.

              Martin Stucki formerly of A1 Savannahs said that his kittens learned to moderate their play and understand their limits by the reaction of the recipient cat who’d complain. My cat has been too rough on me sometimes. I simply retaliate and play rougher on him. This stops him. I was my way of training him. But I am not sure it is the best way. My conclusion is (a) he has not learned the limits of play or (b) he is genuinely aggressive and this could be a territorial thing. I wrote a page about that recently.

              https://pictures-of-cats.org/why-do-cats-leave-home.html

              Best of luck.

    • Hello Greta. I am pleased that you like the website. Feel free to comment on any article and join in the conversation. There are a group of regulars and we are very friendly with each other which creates a sense of community.

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      • Hello I really would like to know what I should do. My cat has only two incisors in the upper part of his mouth, and he’s missing all of them on the bottom. Do you think that they will come back or should we take him to the vet?

        • Hello Camille. Thanks for commenting. I am presuming that your cat is an adult cat. And if he’s lost his teeth then he has lost his teeth and that is that. They won’t grow back. When a kitten loses his baby teeth then they are replaced by adult teeth but that appears not to be the case in this instance. I would be interested to know how your cat lost his teeth. Assuming he is an adult cat then, as I see it, the only way he could lose his incisors on the lower jaw is because they have been broken off or worn by wear and tear but that would seem to be highly unusual. Perhaps they fell out because he has poor oral health. Would you mind leaving another comment to tell us what you think might have happened. If he is kitten don’t worry.

          • He is an adult male cat. He likes to mount another male cat and they go back and forth taking turns.
            I am thinking back to where he likes to sleep which is up on top of our armoire. One day he rolled off and fell but he seemed to be alright. I have recently started noticing after he grooms himself his tongue laps strangely.
            If he has a broken jaw could this be the reason? He still eats fine.
            Please advise
            Camille

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