Happy Declawed Cats
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Happy Declawed Cats

by Grant
(Toronto, Canada)

I have had a couple of laser declawed Abyssinians and it did not effect their life negatively in any way.

They were pampered with the proper litter for weeks and visits to the vet after to ensure proper healing.

They both climbed trees up to 18 inches in diameter, they could jump to the top of a door and swam in the bathtub and the first in a pool as they loved the water.

Their paws spread open like a hand to pick up small items up to and including marbles.

If they wanted up they jumped not climbed.

A cat may use its claws to play with small animals but any large sized cat the teeth are its real weapons.

Regardless of being declawed or not pets should not be allowed to run wild.

Stop scarring people from declawing cats that may end up homeless because they will scratch children, older people and furniture.

Don’t take your cat to the local Humane Society where all the money goes to the staff and advertising and take them to a proper well equipped vet.

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR.

ASK ANY MAN IF HE WOULD RATHER BE DECLAWED OR CASTRATED BEFORE YOU PICK ON THIS ONE PROCEDURE.

Grant

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Happy Declawed Cats

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Oct 27, 2011 Long term effects…
by: Kelly

Grant. While I understand why some people are going to give you a hard time, I plan on going a different route. I would like to explain a couple of things to you as you have obviously not been very well educated by your vet ( not surprising) on the long term effects and the truth regarding declaw.

1) Cats are digitigrade by nature. They walk and balance on their toes, NOT the pads of the paw. Therefore, when you declaw ( and this is a FACT) you change their walking pattern. This puts excess stress on the spine and joints. After being in the field for so many years, I can tell a declawed cat just by watching them walk. After years of having to walk with the weight shifted off of the front paws, most declawed cats WILL have spinal inflammation and arthritis.

2) While you had a decent experience with your declaws, that is not always the case. Laser procedures can, and have, caused severe 4th dgree burns. Other methods of declaw are just as dangerous and all of them hurt. The AVMAs stance on declawing is that it should ALWAYS be a LAST resort. Why put any animal through that kind of pain? Why risk it?

3) Once and for all, and I am SO tired of repeating this DECLAWING DOES NOT KEEP CATS OUT OF SHELTERS! Quite the opposite in fact. Most of my career as a technician has been spent in shelter medicine and I have done my own study on this…70% of cats nationwide in shelters in the US are declawed. The main reason for a cat to be surrendered to a shelter is behavioral problems. The main reason sited for behavioral problems is declawing. So Im sorry to tell you, but that point is moot.

4) I have lived with clawed cats my entire life, and I have children, and I own furniture. It is a lame excuse used by people that are too lazy to train their cat..PERIOD! Teach your children how to handle a cat…and they wont get scratched. Give your cat stimulation and a couple of sisal posts and your furniture will stay intact. It really is that simple.

I am of the belief that anyone who would euthanize or turn their cat into a shelter simply for BEING a cat, does not deserve to have one in their lives. Animals were not put here so that we could surgically alter them to “fit” into our lives. If you dont like cats the way they are,get a dog. Oh…wait a minute…you have to train dogs too. Darn.


Oct 13, 2011 Let’s do YOU1
by: Dee

As a MULTI-CAT household, I am in a position to say that no earthly possession (ie. furniture, curtains, blinds) is worth mutilating and disarming any of my cats. I came to adopt a sweet girl that had been declawed by her previous owner. Although my household is basically peaceful, an occasional ruckus will happen. Because of her impairment, she becomes fearful and runs to me for safety. She is well aware that she can’t ward off any aggression,

I am interested to know how you would feel if your fingers were cut off at the first knickle. Would you be able to perform the tasks you do now? SO SORRY, MICHAEL…. Would you be able to perform one of your most important tasks – JERK (ing)?


Oct 11, 2011 I’m a real Aby carer, are you’re worthless scum.
by: Maggie

Grant, you’re a disgusting, useless, low life, piece of scum. And you should really appreciate the fact that Michael does not tolerate swearing on this forum, because I swear to God, if he did I would have more than a few words to say about you.

I have grown up with Abyssinians, from the second I was born there was an Aby in my life. I can pick a good quality show cat from the second it’s born, and I can tell which Aby came from which country’s lines just by looking at it.

You are obviously not someone who has an Aby for the love of the breed, you’re clearly one of those idiots who get Abys because they’re an ‘exotic looking breed.’

Well, in my LIFE TIME of living with Abys, I can guarantee that they are a breed who would suffer immensely without their claws. My cat who is three today, and his distant cousin, who is 14, and all my Abys from the past, have all used their claws for absolutely everything. They eat using their claws, the go to the loo using their claws, they play using their claws, open doors, run, jump, hide, clean, scratch, show affection, they even use their claws when they’re asleep!

Not to mention, and any GOOD and REPUTABLE, breeder will tell their buyers this, Abys are one of the most athletic breed of cat in the world. How on earth are they meant to live up to these athletic desires, which all Abys have, if their darn toes have been fried off?

As I type this my Chilli is on my lap paw pumping, I haven’t felt any claw induced pain yet, he’s been going for a good 10 minutes, how do your cats show affection and exercise in this way? They are denied so much by being declawed. How can you not see that? There must be something wrong with you.

And who bred your cats? What is the name of their prefix? I want to know who the scum is that allowed my cat’s relatives to be abused, mutilated and crippled for life.


Oct 11, 2011 Rubbish
by: OJ

Grant,have you ever wondered why cats are born with claws?

I’ll tell you why,it’s because they need them.

Ever heard of scratching posts?

They are made for cats to scratch on to stay healthy.

Wow you really didn’t know just how ignorant you are did you!

So your two cats have suffered the most painful and cruel surgery because of that ignorance.

Take a tour around PoC and learn a bit about cats,it’s just a pity you didn’t do that before.

But maybe it would have made no difference as you are the sort who think it’s pampering to provide aftercare for a cat after ten amputations and to provide litter that doesn’t make the pain in the cat’s mutilated toes even worse or cause infection.

Strange that our cats in countries where declawing is banned as animal abuse don’t scratch children,older people or furniture.

Well Grant you are doing the anti declaw cause so much good because when people read your rubbish and our educated replies it will for sure save some more cats claws.


Oct 11, 2011 Your title is an oxymoron
by: Rose

Happy and declawed are oxymorons Grant!

Try crippled and declawed

Abused and declawed

Suffering and declawed

Accepting and declawed

But happy and declawed

NEVER

Cats don’t end up homeless because they scratch children,older people and furniture,they end up homeless because the people who chucked them out shouldn’t have had cats in the first place.

You may not know that a lot of declawed cats end up homeless,many of them killed,because of problems from the declawing.

Scarring people?I take it you mean scaring?

Anyone who is ignorant enough to believe a cat can live happily with no claws needs scaring!

Please let us know when you’ve booked yourself in for your turn to be declawed/defingered.

https://pictures-of-cats.org/declawing-defingering-no-difference.html

I think you may choose castration after all!


Oct 11, 2011 To Grant
by: Ruth

You say ask any man if he would rather be declawed or castrated so you are saying that man has a choice.

Cats have no choice !

Apart from the fact that castration although unpleasant doesn’t affect the way a man or a cat walks, the pain quickly passes and the parts are not missed.

YOU chose to have 2 beautiful healthy cats toe ends amputated for no reason. Parts that most definately are missed and many times causes lifelong pain.

YOU chose to pay a corrupt vet with his/her fancy laser toy to burn off your cats essential toe ends along with their claws.

YOU chose to force your cats to live disabled lives ‘making do’ with stumps instead of toe ends.

YOU chose to doom those cats to painful arthritis as they age because they can not walk or exercise as cats need to, to stay healthy.

Your cats are NOT happy Grant, they have accepted the fate that YOU inflicted on them, that’s all. Cats adjust, they have no choice.

YOU are the one with the power of choice on their behalf and you have abused that power and now come here to boast about it.

Well you’ve wasted your time because no one here takes the slightest bit of notice of anything an animal abuser says!

Kattaddorra signature Ruth


Oct 11, 2011 Rubbish
by: Barbara

To start with I think your description of your cats as “a couple of laser declawed Abyssinians” shows us that you see cats as CAT and not individual creatures with different personalities. You are very cold and clinical and this makes me think that you don’t even realise when your cats are distressed or making the best of a disability that you forced onto them. You also speak of the cats being pampered with the proper litter and visits to the vets, well Grant if you had been in hospital for major surgery which is what amputation of all of your finger ends would be, wouldn’t you expect proper aftercare, in fact you would see as your right clean dressings and follow up visits to your surgeon, so how is is PAMPERING cats to use litter that doesn’t cause pain or infection to their ruined paws and for them to have folow up visits to the butcher who defingered them?

Then there is a list of strange and unrelated facts, yes cats use their teeth, yes pets should not run wild, you’re still not teaching us anything Grant.

But your final comment brings it down to the usual ignorant ill thought out rubbish, comparing a man’s sexual preferences to felines anyway is pointless and comparing castration to declawing is ridiculous. You’re going to have to come up with a better punch line than that to impress us Grant, and remember that capital letters do not make a point more valid. Grow up son.

Barbara avatar


Oct 10, 2011 Your argument is flawed
by: Leah England

And so are you! You waste your time justifying your actions. You talk about all these things your cats can do however you totally miss the point that de-clawing is cruel and in humane.

Do you not get why it is banned all across Europe?

I feel that you know this is wrong however you still went ahead and did it to suit your own selfish ends and now you are pathetically trying to justify your actions to us well don’t bother we’ve heard the same drivel on here more times that I care to remember.


Oct 10, 2011 you dont need to declaw
by: brandy

Cats can be trainned. they dont need surgery to save furniture. and if you truly can get them to stop there is a product called softpaw. you glue little gel caps onto their nails and it makes their claws unable to scratch anyone or anything.

but really trainning them is all you really need.


Oct 10, 2011 Ignorant
by: Anonymous

People are “picking on” this one procedure because it’s cruel and unnecessary.


Oct 10, 2011 Don’t understand
by: Michael

I don’t understand the last two lines of your article. It does not make sense.

I disagree with you completely. As for all people who advocate declawing, you miss the fundamental point that it is immoral to mutilate a cat companion for your convenience. That must be obvious even to you.



Comments

Happy Declawed Cats — 5 Comments

  1. Hi,

    I know this is a really old thread, but I thought the comments were very well written and I hope some of you are still active on this website. I am about to get my second cat declawed. I am heartbroken about this and I wanted to know what you think about my decision.
    My first cat I never considered declawing because I think it’s cruel. However, my second cat… I’m not sure what else to do. I adopted him from a shelter as a kitten. He has always been very aggressive. I was hoping he would calm down with age but at this point he is five. And I’m exhausted and frightened and miserable. He’s generally loving and cuddly. But three to six times a week he viciously attacks me. The incidents usually last only about ten minutes but the scratches are deep and I’m covered in them. I’ve talked to the vet multiple times about this behavior. I have a feliway plugin diffuser in each room. The vet suggested composure pro which I was giving him. Then the vet suggested Prozac which I give him daily in food. He is played with daily with plenty of toys. He has a tall cat tower and multiple scratching posts, balls, mice, etc. But when he decides to attack… it’s like he freezes up and I see this look on his face and I know it’s coming. I’ve tried spraying him with water as he approaches. Walking slowly to another room. Backing into another room and closing the door. But he’s so fast and determined. He’s gone for my face. He scratches deep. And then he calms down but it’s just… untenable. I don’t want to live like this. I asked the vet if she would recommend a behaviorist, and she said honestly she thought it would be a waste of money. That his wires in his brain are crossed. I would pay anything to help him. I would. But nothing seems to help and the vet is out of suggestions. I’m tired of being on edge. I’m tired of my blood being everywhere. I’m tired of deep scratches on my arms, chest, back, thighs, calves, toes, hands. I’m prone to infection and also. It hurts!
    I’ve asked a family friend with barn cats about taking him. They refused as they said they were afraid he would attack the other cats or the livestock. And seeing how he treated my roommates cat when I had one, I can’t disagree. My mom and vet have suggested putting him down. I’m getting him declawed and hoping that with less weapons to deal with I can avoid serious injury better. I’ve read all you’ve wrote. But I still don’t know what to do. ?




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    • Thanks a lot for commenting Kim. I feel for you. I completely understand what you are saying. I’m going to make your comment into an article so that other people can respond to it as well as me. And so that it is more prominent because I think it is quite an important comment which needs to be addressed carefully and thoughtfully.

      I have to confess that my cat does something similar. Not as bad as yours but when you see his face freezing over with that intense wild look you know that he is about to attack. He transforms, like your cat, from a domestic cat into a wildcat. He forgets his domestication. He was a feral cat and never properly socialised. Although I have trained him to react differently.

      This is the reason why he does it. Your cat has not been socialised properly during the two-week to seven-week period in the very early part of his life. In short, he is not truly domesticated. It is very hard to domesticate a cat outside of that early period in their lives.

      Some people would say that you can never rectify this problem. I disagree with them. The first point though is that I would not declaw him. Although I completely understand where you’re coming from. The alternative might be euthanasia which is worse and therefore declawing might be the best of a bad situation.

      I would like you to at least not declaw him just yet and keep up this dialogue to see whether we as a team on its website can rectify this problem. I wonder whether you could video him when he wants to attack. Or take a photograph of him.

      I believe that you might be able to train this behaviour out of him. I don’t think Prozac is a good idea by the way. I think you have to rely on training by which I mean clicker training.

      There may be a trigger-a visual trigger-which sets him off. He may see something such as your bare feet for instance (and I’m not suggesting that you walk around your house in bare feet, I’m just providing an example) which he sees as prey and which sets off the chain reaction of his hunting instinct which in turn turns him into a wild cat ready to attack.

      I wonder whether you can try and analyse the specific circumstances under which he attacks to see whether there is something common to each occurrence. If so you might be able to alter his response to the circumstances through training. In other words when he sees something to hunt such as your feet or your hands he is trained to respond to be friendly rather than to attack. It will be training based on reward and this may be able to rewire his brain.

      I am probably being optimistic but I know that you want to try something as a last resort because I can see that you are a very good cat caretaker.

      Thanks once again for commenting. I will turn your comment into an article right away and then we can go from there.




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      • Thank you so much for this considerate response. I definitely like to think I’m a good cat caretaker. I do everything I can for my pets in the past and I would never declaw over something like furniture. I respect the amazing creatures that they are. I think my cat is just a little… or more than a little… off. And if there’s a way to get me safe and avoid declawing, I would be ecstatic. And if there’s not, I hope that there’s still a cat lover or two who don’t think I’m a wretched person 🙁




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        • I would like you to think whether there is any pattern to the aggressive behaviour towards you. Does it happen at a certain time in a certain place and are you doing something particular at the time and so on and so forth. I would love to fix this problem. It may not be possible. I agree that. But you may be able to train out this behaviour but it won’t be easy. Is your cat a full-time indoor cat or an indoor-outdoor cat? I think that this is an important question.




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