HomeCat HealthmedicinesIs colloidal silver effective and safe for treating FIV positive cats?

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Is colloidal silver effective and safe for treating FIV positive cats? — 10 Comments

  1. New on the site – love it, though!
    Silver started being re-investigated as an antimicrobial agent when acknowledgement of antibiotic resistance began cropping up in the 1960s. It has been used for centuries along with honeys as topical wound treatment. Currently, it is a mainstay of burn treatment but it’s efficacy and limitations are under a lot of scrutiny at the moment.

    This is a PubMed review article (fully visible) that looks at various burn treatments as well as silver and talks about the benefits, limitations, and current changes in methods of use as of 2010. (Warning: is long and medical-y)

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2935806/

    This is a review on the dangers and cytotoxic effects of nanosilver (there’s quite a few documented) – this is only an abstract:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27815378

    Please be aware that most of the research is done in lab settings on either cloned human cell lines or in lab animals. As new studies come out, the largest immediate concerns are around neurotoxicity and reproductive toxicity.

    Additionally, while finding better ways of packaging silver to harness it’s cytotoxic effects (so that it kills cancer and not normal cells, etc), there is data to support that certain silver compounds can help prevent viral *transmission* – not treat current viral infections.

    In summary, silver is being looked into, but in unregulated concentrations or forms as are currently in most alternative medical products, it could be harmful to your pets and has not yet shown any data for treating FIV infections.

  2. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-779-colloidal%20silver.aspx?activeingredientid=779

    There was a horse medication for open wounds that had some type of silver agent in it. The name escapes me. It did work fairly well on a horses lower leg where there is limited circulation. Here it is:

    http://equimed.com/drugs-and-medications/reference/silver-sulfadiazine

    It was when we had a much more limited choice of medications there are several herbal topical sprays now that are truly wonderful.

    https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/hi-ho-silver/

    I’ve had this heated conversation with several people including an ex BF who unloaded several hundred dollars for a home contraption.

    It is selling snake oil to desperate family members other humans and distraught pet owners who at some point are willing to try anything. I promise you somewhere on the container is wording that will release the person marketing these products from liability when you kill your pet.

  3. This is the first I think I’ve heard of it, so based on that alone, and my own predisposition to rely on science, I also wouldn’t use it until last resort if at all. It does require people to try something enough and show that it alone worked for some ailment. I especially reject cure-alls (snake oil). Like a good movie (like Jurassic Park), there has to be some believability to it and not just theory or spiritual. Unfortunately the consumer anecdotal way of “testing” is pretty harsh and unless it’s extremely effective for exactly what it’s claims are for, it’s less likely to be. I even suspect ancient “remedies” or such repurposed for modern use that find their way onto the homeopathic market. At least a vet who’s been through school should give them some scrutiny. I’ve seen business cards in vets offices and wonder too if they are just trying to appear open-minded to clients, which flies in the face of being science-based, so that makes me wonder too. I understand big pharma’s want to make money even at the expense of other supplements also working, and it’s hard to trust the establishment in that regard. It’s a tough call any way I look at it.

  4. I would want verified proof of it’s success. I have seen it used to stop bleeding. It worked part of the time. I understand it can be detrimental to one’s health if used incorrectly. It is not something I would use without further proof.

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