HomeCat HealthInfectionIs it correct to euthanize shelter cats exposed to panleuk?

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Is it correct to euthanize shelter cats exposed to panleuk? — 27 Comments

  1. I hate euthanizing any cat in any circumstances whether the cat is a hazard for myself either either. 🙁

    Don’t have any other idea and I am totally against it. 100% and if I had a shelter, I should have kicked everyone off and stay alone with cats whether on my own life’s cost, no compromise on what so ever happens NEXT!!! to me or all my cats 🙁

  2. Does it make much of a difference as most of the “SHELTER CATS” are normally euthanized in U.S.A.A very lucky few cats get adopted in “Cat Euthanasia shelters” and survive.Tragic that a disease like “Panleuk” is a total death sentence for all the cats in this shelter.

  3. Surely this highlights a weakness in the shelter system. If the shelter system (putting many cats in one place) was substituted by the UK Cats Protection system (volunteer foster homes where only one or two cats were looked after per home) there would be no epidemic catastrophes.

      • What’s really strange is one county over in Abbeville the shelter is run under city services which means the police department is involved. I ran across that situation in Virginia doing a dog article.

        • The Cabarrus Animal Control Shelter is run by the sheriffs department in Concord NC, The Cabarrus Humane Society has a office there so many residents think its NO KILL , Very confusing .

          • Pickens County, SC is the same as Greenwood. But at least on their FB page they say HS and Animal Shelter. Their problem is dogs and cats being stuck there a year or more.

    • My, oh my, Dee.

      Methinks it just may be an attempt to legitimize their nasty little habit of snuffing Fluffies.

      Next time they make the news for euthanizing kitties, they will be able to say “we don’t need a repeat of what happened late last October!” and no one will question them.

      On the other hand… this little “final solution” may have a few (very few, but a few I can understand) “merits”.

      I tend to agree with Leah: quarantine, clean and don’t take in or release any animals for the duration.

      The ultimate solution is to figure out how to make money off of the truly sick cats, and tug at the heartstrings of the public to adopt the survivors.

      Capitalism “rules”. The Brits and the ‘mericans will ‘make book’ on anything: maybe have a Las Vegas or London bookie start setting odds on survivors, and sending the profits from the gambling to the “shelter”.

      Geebus, “shelter” takes on an entire new hue with these folks, doesn’t it?

      I don’t want to invoke the Devil’s own name, but I wonder how long it will take “Mr. T” to start spewing a “See! See” I told you so!!!” all over this thread. (boy, did I ever initially mis-read that fellow: sorry for he encouragement I gave him, dear folks)

      Prayers for the kitties, Bruce.

      • There needs to be clarification between a rescue shelter, the county shelter, and the Humane Society shelter in that area of NC.

        Foremost, this article refers to the Humane Society which claims to be no-kill and are, indeed, killing the infected cats. They don’t even have the forethought to dump them in the county shelter, like most do, so the “deed” isn’t on them and they can maintain their no-kill status. Nor, do they have any interest in pursuing fosterers. They will not quarantine or treat. I can almost guarantee.

        Only private not-for-profit rescue groups will do what is right by these kitties. They will be treated, tested, and retested. They will be fostered when well. I am 90% certain.

  4. Close the shelter to the public, barrier nursing and what they are already doing plus of course quarantine. I don’t think it was entirely logical to euthanise all the cats yet I’m not working there so I don’t have the full picture; there may be other extenuating circumstances.

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