HomeCat NewsconservationLawless Burmese Border Town is Center of Illegal Trade in Protected Species

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Lawless Burmese Border Town is Center of Illegal Trade in Protected Species — 4 Comments

  1. This makes me so sick.
    I could only read half.
    Whatever divine entity may exist needs to wipe this very broken planet clean and start over.
    Try again, ??God?? You f-cked up this one.

    • I hate to say this but it is a great shame that so many wonderful wild cat species happen to live in Asia because in that part of the world, it seems to me, that they eat anything that moves and they particularly like to eat attractive and powerful creatures because they believe it gives them strength and power and a good erection! Is all rather pathetic and sad and a dire reflection on humankind.

  2. Visited the “Little Rann of Kutch” just a week ago and viewing the beautiful wild desert and a few of its native species including the Indian Asiatic wild ass and desert fox have to date seen most “Big Game” in its natural wilderness. Will future generations 30 years from now be as lucky as my generation in viewing endangered species in its natural habitat ? We might be the last generation to view “Big Cats” and “Big Herbivores” in the wild for as a gambling man i feel the odds against few of them becoming extinct is a high probability.Burma is still a closed economy to the outside World and the chinese insatiable appetite for tiger byproducts will spell the doom of this beautiful cat in its natural environment. “CAGED ZOO’S” could be the only refuge of endangered species a generation from now unless a miracle takes place.Human population is increasing and so also disparity in incomes between the wealthy and the poor.This is the right recipe for poaching and deforestation.

    • I feel the same way as you and it makes me angry. Why can’t the international community put pressure on China and Burma to force them to comply with their international agreements? China is rich these days. They could do a lot in the way of conservation but do the opposite. It is a very depressing state of affairs.

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