HomeHuman to cat relationshipcat welfareOrange Cat Collar: Clever Idea or a Dud?

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Orange Cat Collar: Clever Idea or a Dud? — 16 Comments

  1. You are wrong. I have had several indoor cats in my life, and inevitably, one of them decides to try his luck and slip out with the dog. Or rip a screen and escape, ect… It happens about once a year or so, and the little furry b*stard is usually gone several hours before we know to even look for him. While I am not a fan of this game, I do think this is an excellent idea. Having just gone through this when furbutt slipped out of the house two nights ago and was out there during the tornado that ran through Dallas.

      • I find it interesting how you all think I’m this favorite “Woody” person of yours. I guess if you think any anti-stray-cat comment all comes from the same person that it is so much easier to dismiss. That’s called “psychoses”. What’s that saying about De-Nile isn’t just a river in Egypt? I guess it’s those parasitic toxoplasmosis worms in your brains making you act this way. I can’t fathom any other reason. (Nor can anyone who isn’t a lover of your vermin.)

          • I think Woody doesn’t realize that his brand of stupid is so distinctive a copycat would really have to work at it. Only Woody would devote so much time an effort to trolling a cat-centric website. I could fill a steamer trunk with the amount of stupid it puts out.

        • Speaking of which, Woody, I see you’re not over at “One Green Planet” anymore. They tossed you out on your ear, didn’t they, troll? That will happen here too. You must have some kind of mental illness to think that you can troll cat-centric websites and get away with it.

  2. The people that I know tell all criminally negligent and criminally irresponsible cat owners to put brightly colored reflective collars on their cats, without telling them why. They think it’s because we are concerned for their cats. Well, we are, but not like they might think we are. A brightly colored or reflective collar makes it much much easier to spot them at night and safely aim cars for them (when it is safe for all else to do so) without harming the more valuable native wildlife that could be mistaken for an uncollared cat. Some even go so far as to drizzle fish-oils in the centers of urban streets to make a cat stay longer licking at the pavement. Though this common practice is frowned-on in rural areas where it might endanger valuable native animals. A bright colored collar on a cat also makes them a much easier shooting target during daylight hours, enabling spotting stray cats in the densest of shrubs and brush.

  3. Michael, I like the concept, but agree with you that it may or may not truly be helpful. My “kids” will peek out the door (it is at the bottom of steps when I first come in to my apartment), but really have no desire to “get out”. Most of them don’t even like going out just to go to see the vet!! I usually don’t *wear* anything on them since they are all indoor only “kids”. . . ♥♥♥

    • I am pleased you said that. I have seen the same thing at Helmi Flick’s home in Dallas. Her cats are indoor cats and when a large sliding door was opened which leads to the patio the cats looked out but did not step out. It was as if there was an invisible glass panel there. I think cats become indoctrinated into the indoor lifestyle and find the outdoors unsafe.

      • I live right on a main roadway, and if one of my “kids” happens to be at the door when I or my son come in, and suddenly a vehicle — especially a noisy one — goes by, they run like hell right back upstairs!!!! ♥♥♥

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