The Paw Project-Utah Partners with Rescues to Increase Adoptions

Pickles - Pickles had surgery on September 8th, to remove bone fragments and abscesses, and also to reposition her paw pads.
Two useful tags. Click either to see the articles: Toxic to cats | Dangers to cats

Pickles had surgery on September 8th, to remove bone fragments and abscesses, and also to reposition her paw pads.

Many shelter cats are less likely to be adopted because they have behavioural problems such as improper urination, hiding and biting due to being declawed. The Paw Project-Utah (PP-U) has recognized that these cats need an assessment of their damaged paws followed by repair work where possible with the objective of dramatically improving their chances of being adopted.

Accordingly, the Paw Project-Utah have partnered with some local rescues to help declawed cats in Utah. Let’s remind ourselves that sometimes declawed cats find themselves in shelters because ironically the declawing operation has made them less suitable as a pet which is the exact opposite to the purpose of declawing!

Shelter cats are potentially eligible for the PP-U program is they are:

  • declawed
  • can be handled safely and
  • need paw repair surgery

At which point PP-U works with the shelter to organise treatment which may include weekly laser treatments, specific types of food, medicine, or even paw surgery.

PP-U relies on the rescue to have a foster in place, or help find a foster home for the cats. PP-U and the rescue then work as a team to find a forever home for the cats in the PP-U program.

PP-U say:

“Our pawsome Event/Volunteer Coordinator, Nikki S, has made these partnerships possible.”

We should applaud PP-U and Dr Kirsten Doub who heads the clinic. Wonderful work.

Useful tag. Click to see the articles: Cat behavior

Note: sources for news articles are carefully selected but the news is often not independently verified.
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Michael Broad

Hi, I'm a 74-year-old retired solicitor (attorney in the US). Before qualifying I worked in many jobs including professional photography. I love nature, cats and all animals. I am concerned about their welfare. If you want to read more click here.

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8 Responses

  1. Leah says:

    What fantastic news the Paw Project and Dr Doub are incredible πŸ™‚ At least some cats are going to lead happier lives because of the work thats done and the surgery to repair their poor paws πŸ™ I don’t mean to be negative but as Ruth says its just nonsensical that some vets are repairing and some are continuing to mutilate πŸ™ I just wish for the scales to start tipping soon for the cats sake πŸ™

  2. Ruth aka Kattaddorra says:

    I very much admire The Paw Project and the branches springing up now in various places. More vets are joining their team and dedicated to educating about the cruelty of declawing and to helping as many declawed cats in Shelters as they possibly can.
    The pity is that they can’t help them all, they don’t have the fosterers to care for them, or enough money for all the medical help the cats need, or the forever homes for them to go to.
    The tragedy is that too many vets are STILL declawing cats with the old excuse that it keeps them in their homes. It does NOT and they know it! It’s MONEY MONEY MONEY for them as always. Until those declawing vets are stopped, the situation can not be resolved!

  3. Ahsan ul Haq says:

    Thank you for the article Michael as it increased my info of knowledge and

    “Let’s remind ourselves that sometimes declawed cats find themselves in shelters because ironically the declawing operation has made them less suitable as a pet which is the exact opposite to the purpose of declawing!”

    VERY TRUE . . . and to be understood by those fools, who believe that any De-clawing of cat is a right way to avoid natural behaviors of cats. I loved the deep sense hidden in the sentence, great one <3

  4. Dee (Florida) says:

    The Paw Project needs applauding.

    However, there are some issues that I have a problem with. Utah is only a subgroup of PP and, what is happening with one, should be happening with all.
    Plus, I don’t like this condition, “can be handled safely”. I think that some seriously hurt cats won’t qualify because they are fearful and aggressive. Who would blame them?

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