HomeCat Behaviorcat emotionsjealousyThe reason why cats have the ability be jealous

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The reason why cats have the ability be jealous — 7 Comments

  1. I have three cats. The older (12 years old) is highly intelligent and, yes, jealous. She doesn’t care what other cats are thinking, she is jealous of what she perceives they are *getting* and she isn’t. So I call the others to pet, she answers and run to take their place. She doesn’t care about chasing red spots, but when I play with the other cats she will act out and try to call attention to her. And it’s not only in interactions with humans, if the other cats are chasing a bug, she will catch it lightning fast.

    The funny thing is that she doesn’t mind sharing our bed, cuddling with the other cats or seems territorial (the other have a preferred room, she stays where humans stay)

    In my experience the more intelligent a cat, the more they demonstrate capabilities for complex emotions.

    • Nice comment Lanika. A regular commenter (ME King) made the observation that jealousy is ‘resource guarding’. What do you think? Is jealousy simply protecting resources or a genuine emotion? Or are they one and the same thing?

    • The prized position: your lap. It would be nice to see if we could do a cat character profile to figure out what sort of cat is likely to become jealous.

      • The question becomes is it jealousy or resource guarding. Mine seem overly well adjusted at times and we have few squabbles about who gets what part of me.

  2. I agree Michael.I believe that cats and all anmals experience a broad range of emotions, just as humans do. Emotions are a primal response. You do not necessarily need intellect to feel emotion.

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