HomeCat Healthurinary tractWhat Causes Struvite Crystals in Cats?

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What Causes Struvite Crystals in Cats? — 5 Comments

  1. Excellent article, Michael,

    When… when…. when will veterinarians get it that cats are obligate carnivores and need MEAT- not kibble- waterless, inappropriate food for cats- and dogs, in my opinion. Yes- these products are made for the convenience of the owner- certainly not for the health benefits of cats. It gets me so DAMNED angry that vets continue to prescribe RX DRY food even for cats with this condition- when they need hydration- not further water deprivation. It just gets me SO upset.

    I am so fortunate that I have a vet who carries the message to her patients that dry food is NOT appropriate for cats- I bless her each day for the huge amount of research she is doing in feline nutrition. She CARES. She carries raw food diets for sale in her food market- and high quality moist canned food for folks who don’t want to feed raw. Would that all vets would do the same- there is such a need for accurate nutritional information to be given to cat guardians.

    One day hopefully our cats will be fed correctly, and prolong their lives and give them the good health they so richly deserve. Thanks again for your post.

  2. Dry food has never been healthy for cats. It’s nothing more than convenience food for owners.

    Most of the nutritional education student vets receive is sponsored or taught at university by the pet food manufacturers. Vets are then offered financial incentives to stock and promote those brands in their clinics.

    Stress, obesity, lack of exercise are also possible triggers for feline urinary problems. It’s alleged that indoor-only cats are more likely to suffer from struvite crystals than cats with some access to the outdoors.

    I understand that one of the reasons UK vets have traditionally tended to recommend neutering males at around 6 months old, is to allow the cat’s urinary system time to fully develop. I don’t know if any studies have been carried out comparing early/late neutering to see if there are any differences in the number of cats affected by FLUTDs.

    • Most of the nutritional education student vets receive is sponsored or taught at university by the pet food manufacturers. Vets are then offered financial incentives to stock and promote those brands in their clinics.

      I am pleased you wrote that because I have always felt that that was happening. It surprises me that vets promote commercial products even when they should know that the product does not promote cat health and can harm.

      Thanks for the info about neutering at 6 months of age. I’ll look into that.

      • Michael, this article from 2010 was where I learned about the pet food manufacturers influence on the nutritional education of vets.

        http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1244595/Is-food-youre-feeding-pet-killing–making-vet-rich.html

        The situation is exactly the same in the US and probably many other countries because these are global Companies.

        I remember asking my vet in Cyprus if he knew of anywhere I could buy premium quality cat food. When he suggested Hills Science Diet, I told him that I preferred not to feed my cats any dry food. Straight away he asked “Is that because of the risk of diabetes?” I politely explained that was just one of my reasons. Curiously, he didn’t attempt to defend dry food or persuade me to buy it from him.

        That’s why articles like this on PoC and Lisa Pierson’s web site are great, because they raise awareness about potential health problems from something as seemingly innocent as pet food.

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