HomeCat Behaviorinterspecies relationshipsWhat examples are there of cats showing care for their humans?

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What examples are there of cats showing care for their humans? — 5 Comments

  1. Jet will seek out any human who is distressed/crying and he will not leave them until they are feeling less distressed. He will sit on your lap, milk treading, audibly purring, accepting all human touch. If someone is distressed on the radio or tv, he jumps up to find the source and is quite agitated until he realise no one needs him.

    Jet rarely purrs, especially audibly. It took him nearly 2 years here with us before we felt his purr for the first time.

    Jet is a traumatised cat, to me this comforting behaviour tells a sad story. Somewhere in his 7 or 8 years, that little cat has been the sole comfort to someone in real trouble.

    Of course it is romantic speculation on my part, maybe he has worked out that his actions just stop the grating wailing sounds & sobbing.

    I have seen many animals show conscious care to other species, I don’t see why altruism should only be shown by humans.

  2. It has to be defined what caring for someone means. I think it means caring for the well-being of another person or creature. I hardly think cats have any understanding of what well-being means and they have no ability to ensure the well-being of their human friends. They cannot look out for what is good or bad for you and take intentional steps to help you. That is much too complicated for them. Having said that the beneficial effects of having a cat on one’s health are well documented, but that is not because they care for your well-being. It’s just the way they are. There are a few, very few, examples of cats that have behaved in such a way that can be interpreted as being protective of their owners. They don’t even have the instinct to run to their owners when danger threatens, never mind protect them. Several times wild dangerous dogs have got into my property but my outside cats don’t run to me for protection. They head for the bushes or hop over a fence. That instinct has served them well for thousands of years.

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