HomeCat NewsnegligenceThis is what happened to Oliver before he was taken to Odenton Veterinary Hospital and “euthanized”

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This is what happened to Oliver before he was taken to Odenton Veterinary Hospital and “euthanized” — 23 Comments

  1. As an RVT in Missouri, the following statement is completely false:

    “All vets and technicians that work at animal hospitals must have rabies vaccinations. That a legal requirement.”

    I suppose it might be true for their state, but it is incorrect to say “all” and cat it is a “legal requirement”. A day majority of vet techs I know spanning the entire US are not rabies vaccinated because it is very expensive and likely not covered by insurance.

    • Thank you Jessica for your comment. The article was written by a person not known to me but who had first-hand experience of what went on. Thank you for the correction. I have adjusted your comment as you required in your second comment and deleted your second comment which was simply a way of correcting your first comment.

  2. The most disturbing part of this story is her method of trapping. If true, Kaitlin is a lazy trapper and inflicts suffering on the cats trapped. This is NOT TNR. You don’t ever leave a trap/trapped cat all day or all night!! You check your traps and if you don’t get anything you take the trap home!! NEVER leave a trap unchecked for more than an hour( personally I usually ‘sit’ with my trap), let alone 12 or more hours!! This is unfathomable!!! She needs to stop trapping immediately unless she decides to trap humanely.

    • But all those witnesses did nothing. I question all of this and the only real issue is Oliver obviously needed some medical help and the matts taken off but not one of these now concerned critics ever thought to do it themselves. Not defending the person who left the trap just wondering what it takes to get some people up off their big cracks and do something when they see what was obviously animal abuse.

      • Someone tried to let the one on the porch out and couldn’t get the door open. It’s the trapper who should know better. And, if she trapped humanely, there would not be issues of concern. I don’t know how Someone tried to let the one on the porch out and couldn’t get the door open. It’s the trapper who should know better. And, if she trapped humanely, there would not be issues of concern. I don’t know how many elderly people you’ve been around but they are not prone and often not mobile enough to do anything. And, the number of people in general who never want to call the police is astounding. I suspect this was also a low-income area…also there’s a tendency to not want to get involved. It IS the lazy trapper, if story’s description is accurate, who is to blame, even though it would be nice that everyone cared…. elderly people you’ve been around but they are not prone and often not mobile enough to do anything. And, the number of people in general who never want to call the police is astounding. I suspect this was also a low-income area…also there’s a tendency to not want to get involved. It IS the lazy trapper, if story’s description is accurate, who is to blame, even though it would be nice that everyone cared….

        • I have brought up another issue in addition to Oliver. It was included in the story and needs to be addressed. So, no, Oliver is not the only real issue here. Lazy inhumane trapping is going on in Oliver’s neighborhood by the person who took him to the vet where he was wrongfully killed.

          • As I said on FB I do not excuse the lazy trapper. But it doesn’t matter in this case as Oliver needed vetting and what happened was on the veterinarian.
            It’ nice that everyone who witnessed it can now recite the horrors of her trapping but did nothing about it. I see the two issues as connected but separate.

            • Yes, I also see the two issues as separate but connected. The “prequel” is interesting as it confirms that Oliver was completely domesticated but it also sheds light upon an informal TNR program and how it appears to have gone wrong slightly. It also confirme that Oliver was neglected which is pretty obvious but completely domesticated and friendly and therefore backs up the argument that he should not have been euthanised.

              The person who provided the story came forward voluntarily.

          • Yes, it does appear that the informal TNR program was being carried out in a slightly unprofessional way (if that is a fair description). Both it does not change the central part of the story which Oliver should not have been euthanized by the medical staff. The original story holds up despite the extra information.

            • At least she was doing something besides ignoring the problem. If someone set a trap on my property without permission they’d find it sitting at the curb.
              I don’t think this should become a distraction from the facts.
              Oliver had owners who severely neglected his medical needs.
              Someone else took it upon herself to try and help him.
              A veterinarian broke all protocol and common sense and euthanized Oliver by what amounts to force.
              Getting to far off the cat that was murdered simply dilutes the story. There were neglected stray and feral cats in the neighborhood and the people living there likely helped with that population by not using the endless offers of S/N and shot clinics.

              • Yes, well said ME. Completely agree. I think that this page is another story in point of fact. It’s a story about informal TNR going over the line and being a problem. But it also confirms that Oliver was 100% domesticated and a friendly cat which supports the argument that he should not have been killed at the hospital and that he was perhaps mishandled as well resulting in the biting.

  3. Interesting to say the least.
    However regardless of how Oliver was brought to the vet he in no way acted feral and there is still no excuse for what happened at the clinic.
    If someone is setting traps on your property without permission or court order/county law you can remove them.
    Despite the neighborhood feeling angry that someone was rounding up the stray population why were they tolerant of Oliver’s obvious needs ?
    Interesting to note I’ve heard more than one enraged cat owner screaming because their at large cat came home ear tipped.
    Most vets now scan all pets. If your pet has a chip there’s a good chance if they get caught in a cat rodeo you’ll get a call.
    The neighbors done nothing to stop her. like calling the police or AC and they remind quite a bit of my relatives here with their free roam pets who get all hostile if they think someone is going to mess with them. As they said right before I called brand inspect and animal control on them about the starving horses. They’re ours and we can do what we want.
    Try as I might in this story I can’t find evil intent on the rescue.

    • I feel no remorse for ear tipping a free roaming cat…only pride!! And, our ACO has no sympathy for the ‘owner’ only gratitude towards the TNR volunteers. Here TNR is a volunteer community service program.

      • No collar, no chip and running loose on the street. If your cat gets vaccinated, wormed. Checked to see if it’s fixed and then ear tipped negligent owners can just deal with it.

        • Of course, in the UK the no collar, no chip and running freely around the street is very typical. It is not seen as anything other than normal. There is quite an interesting difference in attitude towards these cats between UK and USA. It seems to me that in the USA, as was the case with Oliver, they are seen as feral and dangerous (rabies threat). The trigger to euthanize is readily pulled. Or is that too harsh an assessment?

      • I’m not sure if you are referring to Oliver in your statement. Oliver was not freeroaming in the feral cat sense. He was domesticated and therefore he should not have been treated as a feral cat. Therefore we should not be ear-tipped and put through a TNR program

        • Yes, some cats who are TNR’d are later put up for adoption. Their ears may have been ear tipped when they were spayed or neutered. I’ve seen photos of quite a few. A Community Cat Program may trap, neuter and return cats at large who are trapped. It isn’t necessary that the cat be truly feral. If room allows, they adopt out tame adult cats. Otherwise they just return the cats if the cat appears to have access to food and shelter. This is why many feral cat programs are renamed community cat programs. Guidelines recommend posting flyers or door hangers if TNR is to be conducted in an area to let cat owners know. The aim is to sterilize and vaccinate cats who are free roaming. Usually the trapper uses a vet clinic prepared to handle cats who may exhibit feral behaviour. Cat pictured was TNR’d and lives outside here with another. They displayed fearful, feral behaviour before trapping and while crated before and after surgery. They will now allow us to pet them.

          • I found a cat with a tipped ear up for adoption on the second page on a major adoption website. I’ve heard of some TNR groups who use an ear tattoo instead, but ear tipping is more common. A tattoo can fade and isn’t visible from a distance.

    • I think the lady who was doing the TNR and who took Oliver to the vet was as you say careless or lazy but judging by her Facebook statement she was genuinely concerned about Oliver and his treatment at the vets. Therefore it would appear that her motivation was cat welfare.

      I think the issue of TNR programs in suburban areas trapping domestic cats and ear tipping them is an interesting one. Obviously it is wrong. In a strict legal sense it is criminal damage and therefore a crime. It goes to highlight the dangers of letting cats roam freely in America where there are far more feral cats than in the UK and where rabies is an active disease whereas in the UK it is not.

      There are definitely different attitudes about allowing cats outside between the two countries and I suspect between America and Europeans in general.

      The entire story both the prequel and the veterinary treatment somehow encapsulates a lot about attitudes towards the domestic cat, which is why I find it a very interesting story. It could be said that it encapsulates some of the bad attitudes towards domestic and feral cats and highlights the dysfunctionality of the relationship between humans and cats.

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