HomeCat HealthrabiesWhen To Get A Rabies Shot After A Bite

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When To Get A Rabies Shot After A Bite — 11 Comments

  1. In response to:

    “Due to people advocating for free-roaming cats, you are FOUR TIMES more likely to…”. (Michael’s response) “300 cats out of 160m represents a 0.0001875% rate of rabid cats amongst the entire population.

    Woody, stop scaremongering”

    Really! It amazes me too how people who actually can put a sentence together fail to do the math to support their position. They (he) always just throw bs against the wall expecting people not to check their work. Gladly some of us do. Thank you Michael.

  2. Due to people advocating for free-roaming cats, you are FOUR TIMES more likely to encounter a rabid cat than contracting rabies from any dog today…..

    Note from Michael: I have deleted the remainder because part of it contains insults directed at me…..However, if Woody wants me to publish it he/she can rewrite it in polite language. In the meantime I’ll address the above comment….

    You are referring to reported cases. There were approx. 300 reported cases of rabid cats in the USA in 2009 compared to 81 dogs.

    However:

    “90% of all rabid animals reported to CDC each year occur in wildlife”.

    “There has not been a single case of a human contracting rabies from a cat in the past 40 years in the U.S.” (Alley Cat Allies).

    There are an estimated 80m domestic cats and 80m feral cats in the USA = 160m

    300 cats out of 160m represents a 0.0001875% rate of rabid cats amongst the entire population.

    Woody, stop scaremongering and stop attacking the cat.

    “Dogs are the source of the vast majority of human rabies deaths.” (World Health Organisation)

    Wake up Woody boy 😉

  3. A serious reality here. There was an alert about a week ago for a rabid cat in the downtown area. It can be alarming for people who don’t know what it entails and what precautions to take when approaching any animal they don’t know or is in the wild.
    This isn’t a country where a child can see a stray and say, “Let me pet the kitty Mommy.”
    It’s terribly sad.
    Much, much more education needs to be done so people will be able to identify the signs of rabies and not be afraid to befriend a cat that is no threat.
    Most any agency dealing with animals require employees to be vaccinated. It’s, purely, voluntary on my part because I have so much contact with raccoons that are the major rabies risk.

    • The situation in America is completely different to the UK on rabies. We don’t have rabies as you know. Even animal shelter workers don’t have the rabies shot. Although with mass immigration and a slackening of pet travel rules things might change here.

  4. That is very interesting Michael. I’m glad we don’t have rabies in our country but I was thinking in days gone by didn’t people used to have to have painful injections into their stomach after being bitten by a possibly rabid animal?

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