HomeCat BehaviorloyaltyWhy Are Dogs Loyal But Cats Aren’t?

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Why Are Dogs Loyal But Cats Aren’t? — 4 Comments

  1. I wish people would stop reciting this old cliche. Cats are every bit as loyal as dogs, and sometimes more so. Each situation depends on the variables. I tend to agree with Albert Schepis quote: “Cats have the capacity to be loyal (be excited when we come home, follow us around and generally like our company) but it has to be earned, which many people aren’t willing to work at. Also cats are more subtle than dogs, we don’t work at noticing. So if we don’t put it the work and cats honestly don’t reward it, we erroneously conclude it’s their fault. ” In my opinion, these traits identify felines as highly intelligent. They choose when and how to exhibit their loyalty. This is definitely a sign of rational thinking! 😻💜💜🐾🗝️

  2. Yeah, the question belays the difference between nature and nurture. It assumes the dog is loyal by choice, but if that were more closely examined, the cat still has two feet in the wild, which Michael correctly points out is not pack oriented and is solitary. Both species have been coaxed into being more social with us, but not so much the cat by comparison. So, I would argue that by choice, the cat wins the initial conclusion (who’s more loyal) because she can still choose to live without the companionship of humans and does as shown by their feral population. It’s a confusing situation because they both depend upon humans to survive, but the question is whether they like us or not. I think cats generally are more honest about that, which is what the initial question should be, but we want to hear what we want to hear, so it’s more a sad example of our neediness than anything. Dogs are compelled to adore us by nature, so that’s confused us to think they do it by choice, which cats are more honest about so we incorrectly conclude the opposite because the opposite. It’s kind of the end justifies the means, or something like that. It’s a false argument.

    • Also, as it’s a mistake to compare cats to dogs, as if what dogs do is the ideal and only measure of loyalty, the fact that humans give up on cats from the start gives them no chance to compete anyway. We don’t encourage cats to be loyal, much as we don’t need to encourage dogs to be so we don’t even try with them either. In fact many dog owners punish their dogs routinely just for the fun of it, and because the dogs put up with it. Cats have the capacity to be loyal (be excited when we come home, follow us around and generally like our company) but it has to be earned, which many people aren’t willing to work at. Also cats are more subtle than dogs, we don’t work at noticing. So if we don’t put it the work and cats honestly don’t reward it, we erroneously conclude it’s their fault.

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