HomeCat FooddietThe quality of a domestic cat’s diet affects his or her desire to hunt

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The quality of a domestic cat’s diet affects his or her desire to hunt — 2 Comments

  1. This an interesting aspect to predation.

    Could Hills, Royal Canin, Purina et al be contributing to predation of wildlife by domestic cats by filling their foods with junk carbohydrates? I think they could.

    The amounts of actual protein in many shop stocked and well known brands is still appallingly low too.

    If kittens are taken from their mother too early before she has instigated teaching them hunting skills, they are likely to take longer to develop hunting skills from instinct alone, if they do at all. The mother cat may not have been a hunter either.

    I have noticed an increase in the number of brands of cat food that are high flesh protein and contain virtually no carbohydrates or soy protein. Not to forget the raw cat food industry, which is honestly a wild, wild, poorly regulated mess in the UK still.

    If this hypothesis & new evidence is true, it is kind of wonderful to see that the wild instinct for true satiety & nourishment still coming through after thousands of years of domestication of the cat.

    • I thought this was an interesting concept. It may be the case that humans through the quality of cat food that we provide are cats are silently promoting hunting and at present the hunting of wild species by domestic cats is a hot topic in the news. Anything to reduce that would be helpful. It would be helpful to both humans and the domestic cat. And if it is true, as you say, it is interesting to see how the domestic cat adapts to his or her human environment which fails him, not always but quite often.

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